Find the Career You Want

Dear J.T. & Dale: Everything I've read about job searching lately says you should be very specific about the type of job you want so you can focus on the best opportunities. Well, I have a clear idea of what I want to do next, but can't seem to find any job postings for it. What should I do? — Amanda Dale: What you should NOT do is focus solely on yourself. I've always been skeptical of the "do what you love, the money will follow" philosophy — ask any poet. The advantage in narrowing your job search is to jump out of the long line of applicants for generalist positions and jump into the shorter lines where companies are looking for specialists. To do that, you have to understand your target market — not just what you're selling, but who's buying. J.T.: I recently worked with a woman who had such a detailed description of the job she wanted that when we looked at all the local companies that could possibly hire her, guess how many we could find? Three! I persuaded her to redefine her target, making sure she had a sufficient base of employers in order to have a realistic chance of getting hired. Then there's the bigger issue, and it's a hot subject these days: employability. It comes down to basic supply and demand. It's hard enough to figure out what demand you want to supply, but guess what? The market fluctuates over time, and demand changes. To get employed, you've got to figure out which skills are most marketable right now; then, to stay employed, you've got to figure out what new skills will be in demand. Dale: So instead of searching only for jobs that are "what you want to do," also include in your search all the jobs that will get you closer to that ideal position. See yourself as evolving toward one of the places in the job market where you can say, "This is the work I'd love to do," while meanwhile, you pay attention to where the jobs are evolving, looking for the spot where there are employers saying, "I'd love to hire someone who loves doing that job." J.T.: The beauty of this approach, Amanda, is that working on your evolving career takes away the pressure of finding The Perfect Job. There's nothing wrong with landing a job that will keep you employed while you search for a better one, and then a better one, and eventually the best one. Feel free to send questions to J.T. and Dale via e-mail at advice@jtanddale.com or write to them in care of King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th Street, 15th Floor, New York, NY 10019. © 2012 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. Career choices image from Shutterstock

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Diane submitted. She has recently worked with a co-worker on a group project. When it came time to present the project at a meeting, Diane let her co-worker present. While it went great, the co-worker proceed to take credit for nearly all of Diane's work. Frustrating to say the least!

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In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if your co-worker took credit for the work you did...right in front of your colleagues AND boss!

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

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If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Cam submitted. He's been working at a job for awhile, but recently overheard a hiring manager making fun of a candidate with autism right after an interview-not only awkward, but VERY unprofessional!

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In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if witnessed a hiring manager at your organization making fun of a candidate who they had just interviewed who had autism.

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

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Starting a family is one of the biggest milestones in a person's life. It's in those first few months when a parent can really bond with their newborn and make lifelong memories. However, for some new dads, it can be difficult to juggle being a new parent while remaining dedicated to their career.

Fortunately, some companies have generous paternity leave policies that give new dads the ability to take time off of work to stay home with their child.

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There are LOTS of questions around resume dos and don'ts. There's so much advice out there that it can be overwhelming to try and figure out what's the correct answer.

During our weekly live Office Hours on YouTube, two of our coaches, Ariella Coombs and J.T. O'Donnell, answer questions live from viewers related to their job search, career success, on the job situations and more.

We complied a simple list of what we find to be the most common questions our coaches get about resumes. We hope you find this helpful.

Let's start with the basics...

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Back in March, we made the hard decision to change our private Facebook group of over 37 THOUSAND members to a fee-based only platform.

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