Why Don't Employers Get Back to Me After an Interview?

Dear J.T. & Dale: An airline had me in for an interview and said they would get back to me in two weeks. After the two weeks, I followed up multiple times with no response. After three months, I gave up. Ten months after my interview, I received an e-mail saying 'No thanks.' Gee, what a surprise! I understand that companies may be stretched, but a brief call or note would leave the candidate with a smattering of self-confidence and without a bad feeling about the offending company. - Carolyn DALE: J.T. has on her tough-love face. Steel yourself, Carolyn. J.T.: I do understand your frustration, but your last sentence frustrates me - "a smattering of self-confidence"? Let me ask you this: When you shop for a major appliance or a car, you probably visit several companies. Do you contact every salesperson you met with to say you didn't choose their product? No. And yet, how would you feel if you heard they were offended that you didn't follow up and that their self-confidence was shot because of you? I would argue that your gut response would be: "They're in sales. They should be able to handle rejection." Well, you are a business-of-one, and you are selling a company on your services. It's not their job to make you feel better. In fact, turning you down by calling you won't make you feel better. You'll still feel rejected. The solution lies in not taking it personally. DALE: "Don't take it personally" is right up there with "don't worry," "cut out sweets," and "just don't look" as perfectly good advice that is almost impossible to implement. It's impossible to implement because it suggests that you not do what is natural and automatic. The way out is to give your mind something else to occupy it. In the case of skilled salespeople not taking rejection personally, they do two things: First, they ask themselves questions like, "What can I learn from this?" and "How can I get better?" Next, they get right back to selling, moving on to the next prospect. J.T.: They know that with every rejection, they are one step closer to making the deal. They don't stop. They try and try, and then try again. DALE: It's important to note that they have lots of other things to try; that is, they have dozens of prospects in various stages of the sales pipeline. You, Carolyn, need to be so busy working on your other job prospects that you don't give yourself time to get angry and frustrated because you didn't get a rejection letter. Here's the mind-set to strive for: "Their loss. I'm moving on. I'm too busy to take it personally." Feel free to send questions to J.T. and Dale via e-mail at advice@jtanddale.com or write to them in care of King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th Street, 15th Floor, New York, NY 10019. © 2012 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. Image Credit: Shutterstock

When most people think of Nike, they think of shoes, retail stores, and, of course, athletes. That's all true, but there's more. Behind Nike's walls, you'll find the doers and thinkers who design, create, and innovate every day. There are also data scientists who discover and leverage athlete insights to create the future of sport.

You might be surprised to learn about the impact you can have in Data & Analytics at Nike versus at a major tech giant. Nike employees get to work on a wide array of challenges, so if you're obsessed with math, science, computers, and/or data, and you love sport, these stories may inspire you to work at Nike.

SHOW MORE Show less

Employee loyalty is something every company longs for. It's estimated employee turnover costs as much as 130-200% of an employee's salary. When a talented, knowledgeable, trained employee leaves, it's bad for business. And, when lots of them leave, it can be the kiss of death.

SHOW MORE Show less

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the interview situation one of our viewers, Remi submitted. He was in an interview and was asked the question: How many cows are there in Canada right now? - What a weird question but this is a technique that some hiring managers are using these days.

SHOW MORE Show less

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Kevin submitted. He is a college student who's working a part time job to make ends meet. The manager/owner of the company has become a micro-manager who watches him work on camera and reads his company emails. A bit over the top wouldn't you say?

SHOW MORE Show less

All work and no play can create a tense and unwelcoming environment. Studies have shown that employers that offer additional perks have employees that are happier and more loyal to their place of employment. If you are looking for an employer that acknowledges how important it is to give its employees a place to de-stress and bond with their co-workers, check out these companies!

SHOW MORE Show less

In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if you worked for an owner who micro-manages you my watching you work on camera and reading through your company emails.

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

SHOW MORE Show less