I Feel Invisible as an Entry-level Employee

"JT & Dale Talk Jobs" is the largest nationally syndicated career advice column in the country and can be found at JTandDale.com. Dear J.T. & Dale: I just started a new job and feel invisible. I know folks are busy and I'm just an entry-level person, but I want to grow my career. However, nobody will give me the time of day. — Mimi Dale: Thank you for that question, Mimi. Too many entry-level people are your opposite — they're yearning to be invisible. J.T.: Still, it's not your co-workers' job to make you stand out. It's your career, so you need to find ways to get people's attention. There's a great new book out by Emily Bennington and Skip Lineberg, Effective Immediately: How to Fit In, Stand Out, and Move Up at Your First Real Job. In it, I found a great section called "Thirteen Ways to Raise Your Profile." My personal favorite is called "Don't Be Meat in the Seat," and highlights how you need to build relationships with co-workers in order to get noticed. Dale: I agree it's not your co-workers' job to help you stand out, but should you get yourself a great boss, he or she will encourage you to find a specialty and develop it. However, the average boss is... well, average. So, odds are, you'll probably have to do it yourself. Early in my career in corporate market research, I followed my interests and began studying advertising testing. I developed some new standards for testing commercials. (This sounds technical, but it wasn't — I was just the first to pull together a history of the company's ad test scores and create a kind of "record book.") Meanwhile, I found a consultant who made predictions of what would happen to sales based on various marketing scenarios. I ended up meeting with executives far above my level because I was the company expert on those two topics. The point: It's NOT just the old "who you know" that matters; the "what you know" creates introductions to those "whos" that make all the difference. JTandDale.com LogoJeanine "J.T." Tanner O'Donnell is a professional development specialist and the founder of the consulting firm, JTODonnell.com, and of the job search blog, CAREEREALISM.com. Dale Dauten resolves employment and other business disputes as a mediator with AgreementHouse.com. Please visit them at JTandDale.com, where you can send questions via e-mail, or write to them in care of King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St, 15th Floor, New York, NY 10019. © 2012 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. Invisible entry-level employee image from Shutterstock

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Diane submitted. She has recently worked with a co-worker on a group project. When it came time to present the project at a meeting, Diane let her co-worker present. While it went great, the co-worker proceed to take credit for nearly all of Diane's work. Frustrating to say the least!

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In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if your co-worker took credit for the work you did...right in front of your colleagues AND boss!

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

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If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Cam submitted. He's been working at a job for awhile, but recently overheard a hiring manager making fun of a candidate with autism right after an interview-not only awkward, but VERY unprofessional!

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In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if witnessed a hiring manager at your organization making fun of a candidate who they had just interviewed who had autism.

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

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Starting a family is one of the biggest milestones in a person's life. It's in those first few months when a parent can really bond with their newborn and make lifelong memories. However, for some new dads, it can be difficult to juggle being a new parent while remaining dedicated to their career.

Fortunately, some companies have generous paternity leave policies that give new dads the ability to take time off of work to stay home with their child.

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There are LOTS of questions around resume dos and don'ts. There's so much advice out there that it can be overwhelming to try and figure out what's the correct answer.

During our weekly live Office Hours on YouTube, two of our coaches, Ariella Coombs and J.T. O'Donnell, answer questions live from viewers related to their job search, career success, on the job situations and more.

We complied a simple list of what we find to be the most common questions our coaches get about resumes. We hope you find this helpful.

Let's start with the basics...

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Back in March, we made the hard decision to change our private Facebook group of over 37 THOUSAND members to a fee-based only platform.

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In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if a recruiter called you a day EARLY for your phone interview (and you were NOT PREPARED!)

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

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