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In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if your co-worker took credit for the work you did...right in front of your colleagues AND boss!

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

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No matter how nice or easy-going you are, you will inevitably find yourself in conflict. People will not always agree with you, and you will not always agree with others. I know a little bit about conflict resolution. It was the topic of my dissertation at Harvard. I have found that collaboration is key to positively resolving conflict. When you collaborate with the person with whom you’re in conflict, you focus on meeting both your needs and their needs. This helps you bring together both of your viewpoints to get the best solution. When you collaborate, neither person is likely to feel as if he or she won or lost. Successful people, the people who get promoted, are adept at resolving conflict in a positive manner. They're collaborative; and when you collaborate with others – especially those with whom you are in conflict – you're not only likely to resolve your conflict in a positive manner, you're also likely to strengthen your relationship with the other person. It’s a win-win. Successfully dealing with conflict is somewhat counter-intuitive. By definition, conflict is a state of disagreement. When you’re in conflict with someone, instead of focusing on where you disagree, focus on where you both agree. That’s collaboration in action. This is a great way to not only resolve the conflict, it helps strengthen relationships. And, as we all know, conflict often leads to a deterioration of relationships. This approach is a no-brainer. First, you get to resolve conflict positively. Second, you strengthen your relationships. Third, you improve your chances of getting the promotion you want and deserve.

Your Next Step

If your job search isn't moving as quickly as you want, it's time to take action. Check out this guide to landing your dream job and start climbing the corporate ladder faster! Improving your conflict resolution skills is a great start, but there are other skills you need to succeed in the workplace... LEARN MORE ► Photo Credit: Shutterstock
This is a quid pro quo world: you do for me and I’ll do for you. While there's nothing wrong in reciprocating a good deed or a favor, there's a fundamental problem with quid pro quo. It's reactive, not proactive. Too many people wait for others to go first. They adopt the attitude, “When and if you do for me, I’ll do for you.” This scarcity mentality is not conducive to building the strong relationships you need to get the promotion you want. When you come from a scarcity mentality, you focus on holding on to what you already have. This can prevent you from receiving what you might possibly get. On the other hand, giving with no expectation of return comes from a proactive abundance mentality. When you give with no expectation of return, you are demonstrating faith that the good you do will benefit others close to you and the world at large – and that good things will come back to you. Giving with no expectation of return is ironic. I have found that the more I give, the more I receive; often from unlikely sources. But that’s not my reason for giving – and I hope it is not yours. The best reason for giving is the basic joy of making a difference in other people’s lives and in your company – it helps that people who pay it forward are more likely to get promoted.

Your Next Step

If your job search isn't moving as quickly as you want, it's time to take action. Check out this guide to landing your dream job and start climbing the corporate ladder faster! LEARN MORE ► Photo Credit: Shutterstock
Self-awareness is the foundation of good communication. It’s the first step in building positive relationships and in resolving conflict in a positive manner. Self-aware people understand how they are similar to, and different from other people. They use this insight to help them do things like initiate relationships with a variety of people; determine how much they should disclose about themselves at various points in a relationship; and determine the appropriate amount of emotional support they should offer others. Self-aware people also use their knowledge of themselves and others to determine when and how to assert their displeasure with another person’s actions, and to manage and resolve interpersonal conflicts. If you understand yourself, you can better understand others. I’ll use myself as an example. I make intuitive leaps. My mind goes from A to B to F. Most people aren’t like me. They process information sequentially. Their minds go from A to B to C to D to E to F. When I am with these people, I don’t blurt out my intuitive leaps. When I have one, I go back and fill in the B to C to D to E before I come out with F. In this way, I am better able to get my point across to my sequentially thinking colleagues and clients. Get to know yourself. Use this self-knowledge to better understand and communicate with others. This will help you become a more influential person and get that elusive promotion.

Your Next Step

If your job search isn't moving as quickly as you want, it's time to take action. Check out this guide to landing your dream job and start climbing the corporate ladder faster! LEARN MORE ► Photo Credit: Shutterstock
Your boss is the one person who can most influence your chances of getting promoted. Before any promotion offer is made, your boss will be asked for his or her input. Trust me on this one. If you have a good relationship with him or her, your chances of getting promoted increase greatly. The best way to manage your boss is to make him or her look good. You do this by being a good performer – delivering work that reflects well on you, your department and your boss. Think of it this way. If you do a god job, your boss is more likely to get promoted. When your boss is asked who would be a good replacement – and believe me, he or she will be asked this question – he or she is more likely to choose you if you’ve done a good job and built a strong relationship with him or her. Managing your boss is pretty simple. Keep him or her informed of what you’re working on and how it’s going. Ask him or her how you can help the department move forward. Volunteer for tough jobs. Ask for quarterly performance reviews to make sure you’re on track. Build a cordial relationship with him or her. Your boss has a lot to say about whether or not you get the promotion you want. Increase your chances of a positive recommendation by building a strong, trusting relationship with him or her.

Your Next Step

If your job search isn't moving as quickly as you want, it's time to take action. Check out this guide to landing your dream job and start climbing the corporate ladder faster! LEARN MORE ► Photo Credit: Shutterstock
Everybody knows employers Google you before they invite you in for an interview. Fewer people realize that people in your own company Google you when you’re up for a promotion. When people Google you what do they see? Pictures of you pounding a beer at a baseball game? Pictures of you hanging out with Hooters girls? Or do they see photos in good taste – a nice shot of you and your spouse, or a picture of you and your kids? You may not like to hear this, but this stuff counts. You want to come across as a serious professional online – not some drunk fraternity or sorority kid. I stay away from religion and politics on my blogs, Facebook posts and tweets. You never know who might take offense to your religious or political beliefs. If these beliefs are really important to you, go ahead and make them known on line. But remember, you may suffer some consequences. I think it’s best to play it safe online. Brand yourself as a serious professional. That’s what the folks who are making promotion decisions are looking for.

Your Next Step

If your job search isn't moving as quickly as you want, it's time to take action. Check out this guide to landing your dream job and start climbing the corporate ladder faster! LEARN MORE ► Photo Credit: Shutterstock
I once saw a tweet on line that said, “The impression you make when first meeting someone is 7% verbal, 28% body language, and 65% visual.” I retweeted that one. I’m not sure if the numbers are 100% accurate, but they are pretty much aligned with my personal experience. How you dress does count. When you’re going to work, look like you’re going to work - especially if you want that promotion. If you work for a large company, you’ll notice that your senior executives dress well. Most days, they’ll be wearing a suit. You don’t have to wear suits all the time, but you should follow their example. In general, you’ll find that executives wear clothing that fits well, is clean and in good repair – you should too. Remember that “business” is the first word in “business casual.” Dress like you’re going to work and are serious about your job. Here’s a piece of advice I give to my coaching clients. Every morning, before you leave for work, stop and look in the mirror. Ask yourself this question. “Does what I’m wearing today indicate that I respect myself and the people I’ll meet today?” If the answer is yes, go ahead and knock ‘em dead. If no, head back to your closet and change.

Your Next Step

If your job search isn't moving as quickly as you want, it's time to take action. Check out this guide to landing your dream job and start climbing the corporate ladder faster! LEARN MORE ► Photo Credit: Shutterstock
If you want a promotion, job, or career success, you have to consciously build the image you want to project. Nature abhors a vacuum. If you don’t brand yourself, others will. Abraham Lincoln once said something that applies here: “Don’t worry when you are not recognized, but strive to be worthy of recognition.” The idea of constantly striving “to be worthy of recognition” captures the essence of creating a positive personal image. People who create a positive personal image have three things in common:
  • They develop and nurture their unique personal brands.
  • They are impeccable in their presentation of self.
  • They know and follow the basic rules of etiquette.
If you develop and nurture your unique personal brand, present yourself well and use the basic rules of etiquette consistently, you will become recognized as a person with positive personal impact. There are two keys here. First, work constantly and continually at creating your positive personal image, and on building your personal brand. Second, realize that this won’t come overnight. You have to work at it. That’s the idea behind the first part of Mr. Lincoln’s quote – “don’t worry when you are not recognized.” Your attire counts. When I pack for business trips, I pull out two or three pairs of dark charcoal gray slacks, a black or blue blazer, several white shirts and striped ties. I always wear white shirts and striped ties when I visit my clients. Often, they tell me that I don’t need to dress up as they are a business casual office. I always reply by saying, “I put on my tie today because I knew I would be seeing an important person – you.” This comment always gets a smile – and from what I can tell, people are flattered by it. It helps my personal image. When it comes to etiquette, I have one simple piece of advice – do whatever it takes to make the people around you feel comfortable.

Your Next Step

If your job search isn't moving as quickly as you want, it's time to take action. Check out this guide to landing your dream job and start climbing the corporate ladder faster! LEARN MORE ► Photo Credit: Shutterstock