How To Overcome Your Interview Anxiety

You’re familiar with the feeling. Your palms start sweating, you start to shake and for some reason, your mind goes completely blank. Sounds like a dreaded case of interview jitters! Nerves can bring even the most professional candidate to their knees, impeding their chances of securing the job, even if they’re the most qualified. Related: 5 Easy Ways To Ease Your Nerves Before A Job Interview If you know that you’re prone to nerves, make sure you take the necessary steps to control them; before you step into the interview room, not after. Here are a few helpful tips. How to Overcome Interview Nerves:


1. Be prepared.

Nerves are often triggered by anxiety. It’s common to worry that you won’t know the answer to a particular question at interview, or that you won’t have the necessary knowledge to wow your prospective employer. You can help alleviate this concern by doing your research. Predict possible questions and make sure you know the answers. Feeling well prepared can help to calm your anxiety.

2. Sleep well.

It might be tempting to soothe your worries with several glasses of wine the night before. While this may feel good at the time, it certainly won’t the next day. Have a relaxing bath, avoid too much alcohol, eat well and get a good night’s sleep.

3. Think ahead.

To save yourself time worrying in the morning, lay out your best suit, make sure you’ve already purchased your train tickets or petrol, get some money out if you need to buy lunch, and make sure that all your time on the day is spent focusing on the important task – preparing for that interview.

4. Practice, practice, practice.

If you’re really anxious, ask a trusted friend or family member to perform a ‘test’ interview on you the day before. You’ll get a chance to practice your performance and also receive some valuable feedback.

5. Stay positive.

Remember, you can do this. You’re qualified for the job, you’ve got some great credentials and you’ve got the necessary experience. This company is just as lucky to be interviewing you as you are to be interviewed by them! Boost your self-confidence by telling yourself that it’s in your power to get this job. You can do it.

And in the Interview Itself...

If you feel your heart start to race and your forehead break out in a sweat, take a deep breath. Remember, the people interviewing you want you to succeed. They’re desperately seeking the right person to join their company, and they’re really hoping that you’re that person. If you start to feel nerves getting the better of you, ask for a moment to pause and gather your thoughts. If necessary, be honest with your interviewers, and explain to them that you’re feeling nervous because the job matters a lot to you. It’s likely that they’ll understand; after all, they’re human too, and they’ve probably experienced nerves at some point in their lives. Take it slow and steady and keep reminding yourself, this is your job. You can achieve it! This post was originally published at an earlier date.

Related Posts

How To Answer 7 Of The Most Common Interview Questions Top 3 Tips For Phone Interviews How To Ace The Panel Interview

About the author

Karen Rehn has 13 years experience in the staffing industry. Her zest for business and desire to leave Wisconsin winters behind led her to purchase Helping Hands Staffing Services, which is now known as HH Staffing. She says, "One of the greatest rewards of working in the staffing industry is the ability to make a real difference in the lives of others, I truly believe that our industry has an obligation to actively contribute to enhancing our communities and improving the lives of our employees." Disclosure: This post is sponsored by a CAREEREALISM-approved expert. You can learn more about expert posts here. Photo Credit: Shutterstock

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the interview situation one of our viewers, Remi submitted. He was in an interview and was asked the question: How many cows are there in Canada right now? - What a weird question but this is a technique that some hiring managers are using these days.

SHOW MORE Show less

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Kevin submitted. He is a college student who's working a part time job to make ends meet. The manager/owner of the company has become a micro-manager who watches him work on camera and reads his company emails. A bit over the top wouldn't you say?

SHOW MORE Show less

All work and no play can create a tense and unwelcoming environment. Studies have shown that employers that offer additional perks have employees that are happier and more loyal to their place of employment. If you are looking for an employer that acknowledges how important it is to give its employees a place to de-stress and bond with their co-workers, check out these companies!

SHOW MORE Show less

In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if you worked for an owner who micro-manages you my watching you work on camera and reading through your company emails.

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

SHOW MORE Show less

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Diane submitted. She has recently worked with a co-worker on a group project. When it came time to present the project at a meeting, Diane let her co-worker present. While it went great, the co-worker proceed to take credit for nearly all of Diane's work. Frustrating to say the least!

SHOW MORE Show less

In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if your co-worker took credit for the work you did...right in front of your colleagues AND boss!

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

SHOW MORE Show less