Woman attends Work It Daily's online job search summit

It's not easy looking for a job during the holidays. The year is coming to a close, and between family get-togethers and holiday festivities, sometimes there isn't enough time to focus on your job search. The good news is, with Work It Daily's next online job search summit, you'll learn the right strategies to find a job quickly—so you can end the year on a high note.


Join Work It Daily's founder and CEO, J.T. O'Donnell, and head career coach, Ariella Coombs on Tuesday, November 17th, 10am-4:30pm EST and learn everything you need to know about online job search in real-time, for just $10!

This event will be especially beneficial for those professionals laid off or affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Also, if you're struggling to get interviews even though you know you're qualified, we'll show you how to stand out to employers—the right way!

The job search can be overwhelming even without all of these new and incredibly complex external factors. With this online job search summit, you'll learn the right strategies and gain the tools you need to land a job fast, despite whatever challenges you're facing.

Now is the time for you to get the education you need to improve the effectiveness of your job search. Nobody is going to do it for you. The good news is, it's not rocket science. All you need is the right tools and teachers. And at Work It Daily, we have both, all at an affordable price.

Interested? Sign Up Here!

What To Expect...

Work It Daily's online job search summit agenda

We hope to see you there!

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