4 Steps To Recreate Your Leadership Style

I get many questions from leaders about how they can change and recreate their leadership style. This typically comes up when something feels off to them about how they are leading and the types of results they are getting. Although “recreation” or “reinvention” can seem like big words or big changes, what this article shows is that reinvention does not have to be something big or even life changing – it just has to be something that makes a difference to you. Often times making a few small changes to your leadership style can have big impactful results on those we lead as well as on our own careers. "“I can’t do this anymore” were the words I recently heard from an emerging leader who I coach. She was struggling with a number of aspects of her leadership role and the biggest was her perception of how others expected her to act in her role. She was uncomfortable with the assertive style and directive tone that was common of leaders in her company and more so, she was uncomfortable with the fact that this had become common for her. She didn’t like the way she felt about the style she had adopted nor did she want to continue to lead in this fashion. I challenged her to recreate her leadership style by following these four steps:" READ FULL ARTICLE ►


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