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After firing a woman from the company, an employer hacked into her LinkedIn account and changed her information, according to this article in Business Insider. Should an employer access your LinkedIn account? In order to help her manage her LinkedIn account, Linda Eagle gave her password to her assistant. After Eagle was fired, she claims that her previous employer took over her account, changing her information and profile picture to those of her replacement. Naturally, the Eagle tried to fight the hacking, claiming it both damaged her reputation and lost her valuable business opportunities (which she valued at over $100,000). However, the court ruled her LinkedIn account wasn't protected under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act because a loss of business opportunities is "simply not compensable under the CFAA." What do you think? Is her concern valid? Or is she just overreacting? Please take our poll and tell us your thoughts in the comment section below! [poll id="57"] Photo Credit: Shutterstock

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