3 Major LinkedIn Myths You Should Know About

Major LinkedIn Myths

There is lots of advice out there on how to be successful on LinkedIn, here are the biggest LinkedIn myths you should know about! Before updating your profile be sure to read this first. LinkedIn settings are regularly misunderstood, educate yourself about the three most common myths. If you’re undertaking a confidential job search, every move you make on LinkedIn can feel dangerous. Suppose you update your profile and someone at work realizes you’re looking. What if your boss starts to notice what is going on? The best advice I can give is to be reasonably cautious, but relax. While some actions on LinkedIn ARE public, there are other notifications and settings that aren’t obvious to many users. In addition, LinkedIn changes its format, user account settings, and procedures so often that what used to be of great concern to job seekers has probably changed. A great example of this is your Contact settings, which are (still) ominous check boxes with options that you can select to show you are looking for a job, consulting offers, and so on. Previously, these were openly displayed on your profile, but I’m happy to report this has changed. So, if you are concerned about watching your tracks on LinkedIn, I recommend becoming familiar with its evolution, regularly checking in to find out if you can loosen some of the controls you may have been taught to use in the past. As outlined in my article, you’ll also realize which LinkedIn myths you may have bought into already – and gain insight on what truly will (and won’t) reveal your intent on LinkedIn.   READ FULL ARTICLE ►

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Teacher lectures students in a classroom

My grandparents owned a two-story walkup in Brooklyn, New York. When I was a child, my cousins and I would take turns asking each other questions, Trivial Pursuit style. If we got the question correct, we moved up one step on the staircase. If we got the question wrong, we moved down one step. The winner was the person who reached the top landing first. While we each enjoyed serving as the “master of ceremonies on 69th Street,” peppering each other with rapid-fire questions, I enjoyed the role of maestro the most of all my cousins. I suppose I was destined to be an educator.

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