Home POLL: Traditional Job Posting OR Company Story?

POLL: Traditional Job Posting OR Company Story?

  

Which of the following job advertisements is more enticing to you?

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    A) Traditional Job Posting

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B) Company Story

Comment(32)

  1. I like the traditional since I’m so use to it and it cuts straight to the point, however, I do like the photo in “B” selection. It would be nice if it were combined.

  2. I like the company story. It gives me hope as an applicant that perhaps they are not looking for cookie cutter cloned candidates, and will look for people that can be productive and solve problems / generate needed results. Traditional job postings often come across as cold, plug-you-in-to-replace-the-person-who-just-left grocery lists. Every job, bar none, in which I have been a rockstar for my employer was molded out of the need to solve a problem. I enter under cookie cutter, and rapidly get moved to a position where I’m turned loose to do what needs to get done. There are no job descriptions for that kind of work, and no ATS system that looks at resumes for capability vs ticked boxes of what you have already done. Now realistically, most companies are still going to filter out applicants for checkbox technology or skillsets, but the hope is that it might give a window of opportunity to those exceptional candidates who can solve those needs the managers had given up on filling.

  3. I’ll take the traditional job ad over the company story, thank you. If I’m in a job search, seeing exactly what Company XYZ is looking for in a candidate is much more helpful to me than a page of fluff telling me how great it is to work at “The Grommet” and illustrated by a stock photo and a link to a (most likely) “insightful” Facebook-style quiz. I noticed that after reading all the fluff in the company story ad, I’d have to follow another link to find out if they even have any open positions. Spare me. I think the company story ad might be appealing to recent college graduates while experienced workers are more likely to appreciate the straightforward ad produced by Company XYZ.

  4. I would like to see a combination of both of them on the first page. I like the traditional posting, you know exactly what the company is looking for and the story line is great because it can give you a sense of what the company culture might be like. I don’t want to have to click through several pages to get to the meat of the job.

  5. The Company Story affects a person’s emotive response to the job advertisement. The picture gives you the first impression of “Yes, I want to see more of this…”.
    Having said that though the Traditional advertisement has far more concise information right from the first line and clarifies the exact information that relates to a job seeker marrying their skill set to the job requirement far quicker.

    1. Leanda is right : the “company story” mode is closer to advertisement than job seeking.
      It tells “Our company is wonderfull and full of great people” but nothing clear about job offered. I carefully stay away of this company who place advertissement that look like a spider web.

  6. I agree with Deb. The “company story” looks like a Facebook ad. If I were looking for a job, I *might* click on the link and see what positions they had available, but I would expect to see the traditional job postings there so I know exactly what they are looking for.

  7. In this specific example, I agree with Deb. While the potential of a well crafted creative would be awesome -it would leave a whole lot of aspirants guessing

    Also, in todays ‘seo’ driven world, most searches tend to be keyword driven. So it is quite likely our creative ad posting may never be found by those googling

  8. Agree with Deb above. Ideally would like the introduction to the company to be the story, which is nice, warm fuzzy, but when applying for the actual position would like a formal job description so that I can tailor my resume and cover letter to match the position advertised as closely as possible.

  9. The traditional job description is clearer when it comes to knowing what position is open and what they are looking for. It gives a person a better idea how to match a resume to what the employer is looking for.Every company want driven, creative people these days but what exactly is the job and what are the requirements?

  10. The company story does not appear to be a job posting but rather a marketing piece for loving that company. It does not indicate any openings or that the company is looking for anyone. The traditional posting, while possibly boring in appearance, at least says the company is hiring and gives some information about an available position. It would be even better if the traditional posting had a company name so a potential applicant could look it up.

  11. The company story is way over the top. Making me believe it’s a come on. Been around the block and this is one I don’t want to stop at again.

    The traditional has the information I need to know about the job. I don’t have to go to another section of the site to look-up a job. If I’m interested I can go
    to the company website and look at the “work culture” page.

  12. I don’t want to be hit by PR, or happy images of coworkers especially if they are not working. Don’t care. Most companies are know entities, and many a “happy group” is happy when the day is done.

    I want to see the job description, what it entails, what skills they would like/expect, whether or not a CURRENT ACTIVE clearance is necessary AT TIME OF HIRE, where it is, who it is for and what division within the company, the core hours and expected OT, and what level it is (non-manager, mid-levels, upper-manager), and general pay scale.

    Anything else I want to know I should be able to fine on the company web.

  13. I’d actually like to see both . . i want information that tells me about the company and its culture that I find enticing. But I also need some details about the job opportunity itself . . I can’t just work for a company that may be a great company to work for if they don’t have a job that is something I find interesting, exciting and where I believe I have the right skills and experience to contribute to the company.

  14. I went with the traditional posting because it explains the job itself better. The company story is appealing, but doesn’t explain the actual job I would be applying for.

  15. What bugs me the most is that companies are placing ads for jobs that do not exist. In today’s tough economy, that leads to nothing less than “intentional infliction of emotional distress”!

  16. Company stories are just that – they are filler on the website, a way to brag about themselves and look appealing to a jobseeker. An ad like this is meant to collect resumes. Nobody looks at those resumes and it rarely leads to any concrete job opportunities – I know because I worked for a company for 20 years that had such a story on their website and it meant absolutely nothing. It is a marketing ploy to help the company gain “Great Place to Work” status.

    The traditional ad is seeking a particular set of skills for a particular job opening. That is what would appeal to me, not a lot of corporate hoo-ha.

  17. I prefer the traditional job posting because I can view what the company is specifically looking, but I also find advantages with the company story because it too provides me additional information about the culture, mission, vision, etc. that is not covered in a traditional view.

  18. While the company story is more entiiciing to me, in and of itself, it is totally inadequate to determine whether or not to apply. I would say that what would really work and be necessary is a combination of the story AND a more traditional listing.

  19. Most people are looking for a job, not new friends. I am personally turned off by an ad that extolls the people in the company. It seems frivolous and unprofessional.

  20. A company that tells you what they are about is more appealing because it makes you want to be a part of that culture and succeed as well. I teach an employment workshop and I would love to get the final numbers on this.

    Sincerely,

    Carole

  21. Although the company story may be more “fun”, l like knowing the essential requirements right off the bat. Better than wasting time or being disappointed.

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