Personal Branding

Promotion Killers: Online Stupidity

Promotion Killers: Online Stupidity
Everybody knows employers Google you before they invite you in for an interview. Fewer people realize that people in your own company Google you when you’re up for a promotion. When people Google you what do they see? Pictures of you pounding a beer at a baseball game? Pictures of you hanging out with Hooters girls? Or do they see photos in good taste – a nice shot of you and your spouse, or a picture of you and your kids? You may not like to hear this, but this stuff counts. You want to come across as a serious professional online – not some drunk fraternity or sorority kid. I stay away from religion and politics on my blogs, Facebook posts and tweets. You never know who might take offense to your religious or political beliefs. If these beliefs are really important to you, go ahead and make them known on line. But remember, you may suffer some consequences. I think it’s best to play it safe online. Brand yourself as a serious professional. That’s what the folks who are making promotion decisions are looking for.

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