"Sorry You Got Sick...But, You're Fired."

‘JT & Dale Talk Jobs’ is the largest nationally syndicated career advice column in the country and can be found at JTandDale.com. Dear J.T. &Dale: Last summer I was seriously injured in an automobile accident. I survived and have fully recovered. Six weeks after the accident, my employer sent me a letter saying, "Sorry about your accident, but the firm must go on," and terminated me. I was devastated! I am now ready to look for work but am terrified that I'll end up working for another jerk. I'm trying not to take this personally, but it's very hard. What will I tell potential employers at interviews? I don't want to sound bitter or break into tears, but what he did was very hurtful. — Shay J.T.: We don't have room to print them all, but Shay went on to recount a series of bad-boss behaviors that she'd encountered prior to her accident. Which is why I can tell you, Shay, that we think your being let go will have a silver lining. In fact, you're sure to end up wishing you had moved on years before. Even in good economic times, most people so hate looking for a job that they tend to stay in a bad situation, and then rationalize the decision not to take action. Dale: One thing I learned in my study of great bosses is that most people have never had one. They literally don't know what they're missing. So, with the right search, you can move back into the job market with real anticipation — it's going to be SO easy to do better. J.T.: It will help if you visit sites like Glassdoor.com to read insider reviews of companies and their reputations. Also, be sure to search on sites like LinkedIn and Twitter to see what's being said about the company so you can make an informed decision before you accept a job offer. Dale: As for upcoming job interviews, you don't have anything to worry about. If you rehearse the story about being let go so that you can tell it briefly and without emotion, you will get one of two reactions: Most managers will be offended on your behalf and will want to help you, while a few others might side with your old manager and be unsympathetic. Should you detect any hint of the latter attitude, then you'll know right then that it's another corrosive environment, and you can run the other way. J.T.: Exactly. Good employers will respond by sharing with you how they take care of their valued employees — and that will be the mark of a company you want to work for. jt-dale-logo Jeanine "J.T." Tanner O'Donnell is a professional development specialist and the founder of the consulting firm, jtodonnell.com, and of the blog, CAREEREALISM.com. Dale Dauten resolves employment and other business disputes as a mediator with AgreementHouse.com. Please visit them at jtanddale.com, where you can send questions via e-mail, or write to them in care of King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th St, 15th Floor, New York, NY 10019. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Diane submitted. She has recently worked with a co-worker on a group project. When it came time to present the project at a meeting, Diane let her co-worker present. While it went great, the co-worker proceed to take credit for nearly all of Diane's work. Frustrating to say the least!

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In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if your co-worker took credit for the work you did...right in front of your colleagues AND boss!

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

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If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Cam submitted. He's been working at a job for awhile, but recently overheard a hiring manager making fun of a candidate with autism right after an interview-not only awkward, but VERY unprofessional!

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In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if witnessed a hiring manager at your organization making fun of a candidate who they had just interviewed who had autism.

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

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Starting a family is one of the biggest milestones in a person's life. It's in those first few months when a parent can really bond with their newborn and make lifelong memories. However, for some new dads, it can be difficult to juggle being a new parent while remaining dedicated to their career.

Fortunately, some companies have generous paternity leave policies that give new dads the ability to take time off of work to stay home with their child.

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There are LOTS of questions around resume dos and don'ts. There's so much advice out there that it can be overwhelming to try and figure out what's the correct answer.

During our weekly live Office Hours on YouTube, two of our coaches, Ariella Coombs and J.T. O'Donnell, answer questions live from viewers related to their job search, career success, on the job situations and more.

We complied a simple list of what we find to be the most common questions our coaches get about resumes. We hope you find this helpful.

Let's start with the basics...

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