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So, you are a recent college graduate. You keep hearing about the lack of available jobs and that recent graduates are taking jobs that do not require a degree. You don’t think you can stand out from the crowd. And, the worst part is that your parents, relatives, and friends are asking what you plan to do with your degree. Yes, this is quite depressing. Yes, this does not make you feel good about starting a job search. Perhaps you are even asking yourself why you bothered to get a degree in the first place. Stop! Stop the negative self-talk! Because, there is good news for you!

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Many, if not most, Americans are stressed out, overwhelmed, and overburdened these days. In fact, too many of them are feeling totally stressed out and exhausted. Going through the day feeling stressed has, in fact, become the "new normal." People have forgotten how to relax, even when they are supposed to be on vacation. Related: 6 Tips For Managing Job Search Stress We are learning more and more every day about the health consequences of stress on human beings, both physically and psychologically, and research is constantly revealing new information about the effects of stress on the overall quality of our lives. New books are coming out almost daily pointing to the problems inherent in not getting our stress levels under control. Most of us think of stress as bad—something we would like just to eliminate once and for all. A lot of the stressors that we experience are not the result of negative events, however. Getting married, having a baby, buying or selling a house… these are all stress creators, but they are the result of positive events. Stress isn't necessarily good or bad. It's created by change. Furthermore, the stress we feel is more often the result of our perception of the change as opposed to the fact of the change. One person might not be stressed by the same event that would send another person completely over the edge. So, stress doesn't have to be "bad." In fact, new research points to the fact that stress by itself isn't as troublesome as our attitude about stress. We do need to pay attention to how we respond to stress, however. A report from the American Institute of Stress indicates that (1) 40% of American adults experience negative health effects that are the result of stress, and (2) between 70%-95% of the visits made to our family doctors are the result of stress-related complaints. As bad has this information may sound, there are practices that you can adopt as part of your daily lifestyle that will help you deal with stress more proactively and responsibly. There are, in fact, seven (7) practical habits that you could start incorporating into your daily lifestyle that would help you become stronger and more resilient. They don't cost anything, and they are simple, if not necessarily easy, practices that you could begin right away if you were to decide to practice them as part of your own routine.

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This weekend, most of us will end up doing something social that involves meeting new people. Here’s a quick tip for being more memorable... in a good way. Related: 18 Easy Conversation Starters For Networking Events After the normal introductions (i.e. your name and what brought you to the event) do something crazy. Don't ask the person what they do for work. That’s right. Go against the societal norm and avoid asking the question, “What do you do?”

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Many, if not most, Americans are stressed out, overwhelmed, and overburdened these days. In fact, too many of them are feeling totally stressed out and exhausted. Going through the day feeling stressed has, in fact, become the "new normal." People have forgotten how to relax, even when they are supposed to be on vacation. Related: 6 Tips For Managing Job Search Stress We are learning more and more every day about the health consequences of stress on human beings, both physically and psychologically, and research is constantly revealing new information about the effects of stress on the overall quality of our lives. New books are coming out almost daily pointing to the problems inherent in not getting our stress levels under control. Most of us think of stress as bad—something we would like just to eliminate once and for all. A lot of the stressors that we experience are not the result of negative events, however. Getting married, having a baby, buying or selling a house… these are all stress creators, but they are the result of positive events. Stress isn't necessarily good or bad. It's created by change. Furthermore, the stress we feel is more often the result of our perception of the change as opposed to the fact of the change. One person might not be stressed by the same event that would send another person completely over the edge. So, stress doesn't have to be "bad." In fact, new research points to the fact that stress by itself isn't as troublesome as our attitude about stress. We do need to pay attention to how we respond to stress, however. A report from the American Institute of Stress indicates that 40% of American adults experience negative health effects that are the result of stress, and between 70%-95% of the visits made to our family doctors are the result of stress-related complaints. As bad has this information may sound, there are practices that you can adopt as part of your daily lifestyle that will help you deal with stress more proactively and responsibly. There are, in fact, seven practical habits that you could start incorporating into your daily lifestyle that would help you become stronger and more resilient. They don't cost anything, and they are simple, if not necessarily easy, practices that you could begin right away if you were to decide to practice them as part of your own routine.

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