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At a recent job fair, a woman approached my booth and asked me a question about hiring discrimination. She was a hiring manager from another company also exhibiting at the job fair, but she wanted to know about her son’s prospects for getting a job. Related: 4 Signs You May Be Facing Employment Discrimination I talked to her about the type of work her son is interested in and asked some other questions. After chatting for a while, she told me that she knows her son has good qualifications, but he keeps getting turned down after the interviews. She then shared that her son has a large tattoo on his face. She asked me if I thought his tattoo might be hurting his chances of employment. I was honest with her and told her yes. The reality is that hiring managers discriminate, and they are totally within their rights to not hire someone with a facial tattoo (or piercing) that they believe would be offensive or inappropriate in their workplace or with their customers. A lot of jobs require employees to be customer-facing and on client sites. Although tattoos and body piercings are becoming more mainstream, there are still many traditional workplaces that favor a more conservative look. In fact, it’s very common for employers to have a dress code policy that may ban visible tattoos and piercings. Many employers also have policies that require employees to totally remove body piercings while in the office or cover tattoos with clothing and/or makeup. There are a number of protected classes when it comes to employment law. Employers are prohibited from discriminating against candidates based on age, gender, disability, national origin, pregnancy and a number of other categories. However, there are no current laws that prohibit discrimination against people with visible tattoos, body piercings, unnatural hair colors, unique hairstyles, and so on. There have been some grassroots efforts to make body art and body modification protected classes, but those efforts have not been successful. While it may not be fair to discriminate against a tattooed or pierced person, it does happen. In recent years, the number of people with tattoos and body piercings has increased significantly and we may see employers relax their standards in the future, but we’re not there yet. If you have tattoos and piercings and you feel they are an important part of your personality, make sure you find a workplace that’s accepting of them. This post was originally published on an earlier date.

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Quite simply, proper office etiquette refers to an unwritten code employees should follow in order to be successful in the workplace. It’s a set of norms widely accepted as appropriate behavior. Office etiquette may include having good manners and being courteous of others, as well as using workplace technology in a suitable manner. Related: 10 Essential Email Etiquette Tips You Can’t Afford To Ignore Here are a few tips for good office etiquette:

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There used to be a day and age where you were expected to dress business professional for your interviews. Well, times and businesses have changed, yet the expectations on how you dress have not. Yes, there is more leniency on the dress code, but most experts still suggest that you dress business casual at a minimum. But why? Related: 5 Tips For Dressing Your Best For Interviews Why should I or anyone else dress business casual or business professional if that's not the type of job that we're looking for? Business culture is becoming far more relaxed, and individuals like myself prefer a company that is more fun and open. So, although dress for success is a great tagline, and you should always aim for success - it makes more sense to dress for the job that you want. A great example of this was when I had an interview with Blizzard Entertainment for my MBA internship. Business students are generally taught to be professional. My class even had a "Dress for Success" event where we were told to go no less than business casual, meaning jacket but no tie. Luckily for me, my career advisor had connected me with a Blizzard employee who advised me to dress casually for the interview. If you do not know Blizzard, they are one of the world's largest gaming companies and many employees come to work in a t-shirt, shorts, and flip-flops. How ridiculous would it have been if I had shown up to the interview in a suit and tie? Pretty ridiculous, and that is why you need to know the type of company that you are interviewing with. So, what does this all mean for you? It means that you need to dress for the job you want and the company you want to work for. If you are looking to get hired by a powerful law firm, then it obviously makes sense to dress the part and power suit up. But if you are like myself and enjoy the casual, start-up culture, then dress casually to your interviews while still remaining appropriate. If you have the same work culture preferences as me but are dressing business professional/casual for interviews, you are either overdressing for your interviews or applying to the wrong companies. So, my advice? Search for opportunities at companies that match your style and cultural needs, dress the part for the type of jobs and companies that you select, and feel comfortable while kicking some butt at your interviews!

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Whether you are attending an interview for that dream job, or just hoping to make a great impression in your existing workplace one thing is certain – the way you dress can have a huge impact! This is one area in which men definitely have it a little easier than their female counterparts. Related: 5 Bad Fashion Habits To Break In 2014 It is tough to go too wrong with a classic suit/shirt/tie combination. However, for women choosing appropriate business attire is a little more difficult.

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