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We've got some bad news for you, college grads. That diploma you've worked so hard to get isn't worth as much as you might think. In fact, your college degree doesn't matter to employers (in a lot of cases). Here's why... While they are required in certain fields, college degrees have become sort of a prerequisite for jobs. That means, more people are attending college. As a result, there's a LOT of competition out there when it comes to finding your first job after college. So, your shiny college degree doesn't set you apart from the thousands of other graduates just like you. But what can? According to career expert J.T. O'Donnell, your aptitude and personality can really help to set you apart from all of these other recent grads. Your aptitude is your natural ability to do something. What unique strengths can you bring to an organization? How can they add value? Your personality is also an important factor here. How do you interact with people? How do you connect with them? Your personality can really set you apart from other candidates if you're a good culture fit at an organization, so don't be afraid to let the real you shine. "When you can display great attributes with your aptitude and your personality, you are going to stand out to employer because EVERYBODY has a college degree," said O'Donnell. Plus, most recent graduates don't have a ton of experience to offer employers. As a result, the only things they can differentiate you on are your aptitude and personality. Remember, in most cases, your college degree doesn't' matter to employers. Get clear on your strengths and character traits so you can show your value to employers.

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What do Richard Branson, Alan Sugar, Philip Green, and Simon Cowell have in common? None of them went to university – indeed, none of them even have an A-Level. Related: Resumes When You Don’t Have A College Degree These are four exceptional figures who have a fierce drive for business, and lots of natural talent. It’s difficult to know what additional benefits a degree would have given them; indeed Sugar himself said in this interview with the Telegraph that university would have been a waste of time for him, particularly as he had already made £200,000 by then. Go to most job-hunting websites and you’ll find a section for graduates – there is no specific section for non-graduates. A degree offers a complete, over-arching study of a topic that a non-graduate will not possess. It encourages experimentation, collaboration, discussion and analysis, taught by experienced people, in an environment of people who are each passionate about that subject. But the curious aspect of university life is that the degree is sometimes less important than the additional factors which define student life. Once an employer has asked for a graduate, and received 100 CVs from graduates, then the subject and perhaps even the grade lessens in importance compared to the extra-curricular activities such as the clubs and societies an applicant joins. To take an example, which is most important in John Cleese’s student life – that he read law, or that he joined Cambridge Footlights? Universities provide a platform for a pupil to become an employee. A graduate learns to live independently, in new surroundings. They will be exposed to fresh views about life, from students from across the country and world, and will hope to gain improved confidence, communication, financial, and organization skills. The overall life package and people skills that university offers cannot be replicated. Life afterwards can be a massive hangover, in more ways than one. An average starting wage for a graduate of £18-24,000 cannot be sniffed at, but according to recent figures from the Higher Education Statistics Agency, which were analyzed in the Independent, 18,500 graduates from 2013 were still out of work six months after leaving university, and many more had taken manual jobs or roles in retail. The unemployment figure equates to one in 12 students, while another third (59,600) were in jobs that did not necessarily require degrees. But of course these statistics can be reversed – 11 out of 12 students finding jobs within six months sounds far healthier. For those who haven’t found the ‘right’ job, they can still apply for a far wider scope of job than those who do not have a degree. Sadly, the benefits of a degree for many will be outweighed by the costs. Student debt is now regularly in the tens of thousands rather than thousands, and you may need to look at loans to survive, but be careful of short-term fixes – click here for more. True, if you do not go to university you are likely to start on a lower wage, but the flip side is that you’ll be starting that working life three years earlier than students, and therefore gaining three years’ more wages. Some jobs just simply do not need a degree, and some students soon realize that their degree was wrong for them. Bill Gates and Steve Jobs both dropped out of university early, and didn’t do too badly in the end – here are Time Magazine’s top ten ‘dropouts.' At the end of university life you may not have the job you want, and snaring it might be a tough and frustrating journey. You might not be as financially happy as you expected. But your career options will be wider, your friendship circle will be more interesting, and your life will be richer, even if you are not. This post was originally published at an earlier date.

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College is a brand new world for students to explore right after high school. Many say it is your test towards living the ‘life’ as you take a big step in being totally independent to be able to graduate. And the entire process of it all starts with having to choose the right degree program that would suit best not just your personality but your long term dreams, too. Even when you're just in high school, it's not too early to start pondering about the possible degree programs you may end up taking. This is just the first step in your selection process.

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Although a Master of Public Health (MPH) and a Master of Healthcare Administration (MHA) are two degrees that appear to be similar, they actually have some important differences. Both degrees focus on healthcare and may share some common core courses, but the majority of the curriculum required for each is distinct. So, which degree makes sense for you? Here's the head-to-head match-up: MPH vs. MHA.

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