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According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, a Physical Therapist (sometimes called a PT) is someone who helps “injured or ill people improve their movement and manage their pain.” While that is certainly true, the vagueness of the description can be something of a turn off for someone who might be thinking of physical therapy as a viable career option. Related: 5 Dynamic Ways To Reinvent Your Career Path Pop culture doesn’t really help with this. Every time a physical therapist is featured on television or in a movie, their actions seem limited to teaching people who to walk or move their arms again. Yes, physical therapists do sometimes help people re-learn how to walk and how to improve their range of motion in various limbs. This is not, however, all they do. There are many different jobs that fall under the “physical therapy” umbrella. If you’ve been intrigued by the field and have looked into studying PT, but are turned off at the idea of having to be confined to a hospital ever day, you might want to consider the following specializations.

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Despite an admittedly unsteady economic climate in the United States, professionals in the field of physical therapy are finding that their jobs are more secure than ever before. The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that, as of 2012, the growth rate for physical therapy jobs measures at approximately 39 percent each year. This rate of increase is regarded as much faster than average with a median pay expectation of approximately $76,000 annually.

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