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I struggle to write about this subject because it might suggest that there are special strategies to keep your job during a recession. I personally believe excellent work ethics helps you keep your job during the economic downturn. Those very strategies will also help you move up the corporate ladder in good times. Regardless of the economic climate, one should always practice good work ethics. If I have to choose, these will the few things that will help in keeping your job during a recession.

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Is changing careers a good idea in this economy? There is always good rationale for staying exactly where you are. In good times, the promo potential increases - so you need to stay. In the bad economy, there are fewer jobs and you need to stay. The bottom-line is you. If you think you need to change, then you need to do the work to figure out your new career. Changing careers is not the same thing as changing jobs, just to be clear. Some of the worst job searches I've seen are people who want to change careers. However, since they haven't done the work to figure it out, they think they will change careers by virtue of "finding something." If you have a job, I suggest you stay in it and figure out what your next career is going to be first. When you have it identified, you will know what moves or actions you need to take. It may include staying right where you are until you have positioned yourself to make a move. Some career changes entail some education, different experience or a whole host of things. Once you understand those elements, then you can plan financially if that is appropriate, get your education or even gain new experiences right where you are. Once you have your career identified and actions plotted out you will launch a much more effective job search. You will most likely need to also set your expectations your search will take you longer than it may have in the past - that is definitely a by-product of our economy right now. Changing careers can be the best thing you ever did for yourself. Photo Credit: Shutterstock

In the midst of the Great Recession, many workers have found themselves cobbling together short-term or temp jobs in order to pay the bills. These workers often become very concerned about how this work activity will appear on their resumes. If you're worried about how to address temp jobs on your resume, take heart—many people are in the exact same situation. The first thing you should know is the current economy has forced many workers to take jobs for which they are overqualified. It has also displaced many experienced, competent professionals from the workforce. Given this, the stigma once attached to taking a temporary job or a job beneath your qualifications has lessoned greatly. Hiring managers receive resumes all the time from people who are doing the best they can to make it. The most important thing they look for is proof a laid-off worker is being productive with his or her time—whether that’s through obtaining further education, volunteering in the community, freelancing, or working temporary or part-time positions. I recently worked with a client who had left the full-time workforce for 13 years in order to care of her special needs child. Although she seemed to view this period as a throwaway on her resume, the reality was she had started two successful businesses during that time and had obtained an additional professional certification as well. Rather than perceiving a hole in her resume for the time she’d spent raising her son, I saw an entrepreneur who was determined to provide for her family in the midst of very challenging circumstances. Likewise, showing temporary work on your resume instills among worthwhile hiring managers the same feelings of compassion. It demonstrates even when times are hard, you have the work ethic to do whatever you can to stay in the game. Hiring managers know there are just as many people competing for those temporary jobs as for their full-time positions—so your having one shows tenacity in and of itself. Wherever you are currently working, you’re contributing something to that company’s operations and bottom line. Including this work on your resume shows you’re a team player and a hard worker—and every company appreciates that. Photo Credit: Shutterstock

Are you sick of hearing bad news about the economy and job market? Well then, this post is for you. I'm not trying to discount the fact a lot of people are suffering professionally these days. Yet, the reality is a recession actually has some short-term and long-term upsides when it comes to how we view and manage our careers. That's right, there is some good coming out of the millions of lost jobs, wide-spread hiring freezes, and staggering unemployment rate.

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