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For those of you like me, work is more than a paycheck. It is part of my identity. It brings me pride and energizes me. And when I think about how we position ourselves at work, there is such a disconnect. We are people doing great work for companies that need our abilities. Related: How To Stand Out At A New Job (And Fit In Too) And yet, the whole thing always boils down to bullet points on a list (shiver!). Could be a job description, could be a resume. And, I don’t know about you guys, but I am so much more than bullet points. We all are. Once we realize you are more than bullet points, we can start elevating. We are so much more than our job descriptions and resumes. We are people who deliver and perform, and get results. So, how can we get our manager or a recruiter’s attention once we know we are so much more? Like anything, we need to get someone’s attention, keep their attention and close the deal. There are things we can do in each of these instances to advance our career. Here are three things you can do to stand out at work or to a recruiter:

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Employers are inundated with quality candidates these days, whether through online job postings, submissions through their corporate websites, or unsolicited contacts from prospective employees. So, what’s the best way to cut through the clutter and grab a company’s attention? Their employee referral program. Related: Top 5 Barriers To Job Or Contact Referrals In A Job Search According to a recent New York Times article “big companies are increasingly using their own workers to find new hires, saving time and money.” At large firms such as Ernst & Young, employee referrals account for 45% of nonentry-level new hires, while Deloitte sources 49% of their experienced hires in the same way. A recent study by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York found that “referred candidates are twice as likely to land an interview as other applicants. For those who make it to the interview stage, the referred candidates had a 40% better chance of being hired than other applicants.” Lastly, Jobvite’s research shows that:

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Recruiters spend about six seconds on your resume. SIX SECONDS! That’s not a lot of time to sell yourself. If you want to make a strong (and positive!) first impression, you need to know what they are looking for BEFORE you write your resume. Related: 7 Ways Your Resume Is Boring Just Like Everyone Else’s Here are three tips from LinkedIn Influencer, J.T. O’Donnell, for making your resume stand out to recruiters:

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