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Have you ever had an “oh my gosh, I’m in love with my boss” moment? How did you handle it? Today, career experts J.T. O’Donnell and Dale Dauten tackle the following question from a reader...

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Think your boss is having an affair? You’re not alone. Today, career experts J.T. O’Donnell and Dale Dauten tackle the following question from a reader...

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Congratulations! You're starting a new job. It’s an exciting time, sure, but also an uncertain time. There are so many questions: Will my responsibilities match the job description? Will I mesh with the new team? Will they recognize my prior experience? Will I be successful in my new role? Related: 4 Phrases Your Boss LOVES To Hear These are questions that time and on-the-job experience will answer, right? Sure... to an extent. While time and "just jumping in" with the team will ease some of those new-hire insecurities, the key element to beginning a new role is building a solid relationship with your manager. Regardless of the "rockstar" status you possess in your industry or with a previous job, your prestigious degree, or even the years of experience that fill your resume, your manager is the gateway to success in your new role. Some managers are better than others at nurturing a new employee. Right now, you're probably thinking of a time when you started a new job, and your direct supervisor was, for all intents and purposes, non-existent. Sidenote: If you are a manager and this describes you, take this bit of tough-love advice: Your employees deserve better than that. They need you. Be the manager you would want to work for. Take a moment to ponder that. Building a relationship with your new manager isn't complicated. It must be intentional, genuine, and built on a foundation of respect. As a new employee, ideally you should be spending some time with your manager every day for the first couple of weeks, even if only for a brief check-in. These meetings are ideal opportunities to jump-start the dialogue. Here are five simple conversations you need to have with your boss when you start a new role:

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Sometimes, avoiding conflict in the workplace can be difficult. However, it's extremely doable. Related: How To Deal With Conflict In The Workplace Here's a personal example: While at work one day, I received an instant message from a colleague. It read, “Do you have a minute to chat?” “Of course,” I responded. Instantly, the phone rang. To be honest, I assumed this would be a routine call pertaining to a joint proposal this co-worker and I were collaborating on, and so I was a bit blindsided by what followed. “I came across a post you wrote recently about rolling your eyes in a meeting,” she said. “And I just wanted to ask if you were writing about me.” Awkward silence. The truth is, I did write a post about a meeting where I had behaved uber-immaturely and, yes, she was the voice on the phone. I explained the situation: I was rolling my eyes at the characteristically bureaucratic nature of corporate decision-making and the post was about my mistake and not her. She listened politely, seemed genuinely interested in the root cause of my ire, and we hung up the phone. But here’s the catch: rather than feel defensive or put on the spot, I felt fine. No drama. No hurt feelings. No lingering doubts or suspicions. Now, let’s contrast this to how she could have handled the situation, shall we? Upon reading my post, she could have...

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