Got an Interview But I Have Jury Duty, Help?

Dear Experts, I am about to start the interview process with a company. However, I've been called for jury duty at the beginning of next month and I am out of postponements. When should I let the interviewing company know I have to report for jury duty service? Here is how our T.A.P. experts answered this question:@jtodonnellQ#176 Get through 1st interview & see if you get called back. Then let them know so they can work w/you. @resumesrevealedQ#176 Tell employer ASAP, try to interview b4 or after jury duty hrs. Give them max time 2 work w/you on schedulng. @juliaericksonQ#176 Find out usual length jury duty & hours; tell employer situation; c if can do early am/evening interview. @keppie_careersQ#176 Jury duty might interfere w/scheduled interview? Tell company ASAP. Give dates & keep them in loop. @ValueIntoWordsQ#176 Agree w/@kgrantcareers: try postpone jur duty again, if no, then tell company-maybe they can interview u early. @kgrantcareersQ#176 Try 2 postpone jury duty one more time. If can't, contact interviewer nd schedule different date 4 interview asap. @heatherhuhman: Q#176 Agree w/other experts. Tell them immediately, and provide alternative times you are available. @dawnbugniQ#176 Immediately. Allows them to plan accordingly. Consideration goes a long way in a job search. @gradversityQ#176 ASAP. Explain the situation and they should understand. They are legally required to give you this time off. Our Twitter Advice Project (T.A.P.) is no longer an active campaign. To find an answer to the above question, please use the "Search" box in the right-hand column of this website.

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