Is It Taboo to Have Two-Page Resume?

Dear Experts, Is it taboo to have a two-page resume? All the experience I've listed is relevant to the job I'm applying for. Here is how our T.A.P. experts answered this question:Q#231 Rez should be as long as it needs to be to convey value. If info pertains, don't sweat arbitrary limits. (@dawnbugni) Q#231 I have no problem with two page resumes, so long as there is only relevant information included (for the job). (@gradversity) Q#231 A two-page resume is fine as long as it is relevant and provides the information you need to convey in concise manner. (@DebraWheatman) Q#231 Advice: NOT AT ALL! 2 pages is fine as long as all the information is relevant. Good luck! (@louise_fletcher) Q#231 It better be amazing, that's all I have to say. No "1/4 page" on the second one. Make it good or cut it. (@beneubanks) Q#231 Yes, normal 2 have 2 page resume. Day of the 1 page resume is gone (this rule doesn't apply to gov job apps). (@kgrantcareers) Q#231 Only 15+yrs exp or more merits 2pgs. Long resumes = yawn & placement in 'maybe' pile. Keep it short! (@jtodonnell) Q#231 No 1 answer re: length of resume. Depends (industry, yrs of exp, etc.) More imp: CONTENT. (@keppie_careers) Our Twitter Advice Project (T.A.P.) is no longer an active campaign. To find an answer to the above question, please use the "Search" box in the right-hand column of this website.

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