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Dear Experts, I graduated in May, and after months of job searching, I finally landed my entry-level dream job in advertising in December. However, after a month, they determined it wasn't a good fit and let me go. How do I represent that time on my resume as I begin applying for new jobs? Do I not include it and pretend to future employers that I never had a full-time job (and is that legal and ethical?), or do put it on there? If the latter, what reason would I give them for not working there anymore? I'd love to use this advertising experience on my resume because I learned a lot. It would really add spark and more experience to my resume and help me get into future advertising positions, but I don't know if I'd just be sabotaging myself. Here is how our CAREEREALISM-Approved Experts answered this question on Twitter: Q#443 Definitely include job if u can get 2 point of feeling OK it wasn't right fit & your liking for that. (@juliaerickson) Q#443 It is good exp. put it on. Sometimes it is not a good fit. You will need 2 formulate your response for interviews. (@DebraWheatman) Q#443 Focus resume solely on value you provided. Prepare BRIEF, neutral explanation of 'not being a fit' for interviews. (@ValueIntoWords) Q#443 Include it, but be positive re: why the job wasn't a fit. Focus on skills and never speak poorly of your old firm. (@EmilyBennington) Q#443 I'd emphasize the "lack of fit." That could happen to anyone. Make sure & include relevant stuff learned. (@beneubanks) Our Twitter Advice Project (T.A.P.) is no longer an active campaign. To find an answer to the above question, please use the "Search" box in the right-hand column of this website.

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