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Ever feel uncertain when it comes time to end your talk? You’re not alone, especially if you have to ask for something when you close your presentation or pitch. It might be easy for you to get the ball rolling and open your talk, but when it comes to closing it, you might struggle. Why is that? Why are we afraid to tell people what to do? Why are we scared of asking them to commit to an action or next step after the presentation? Because we don’t trust ourselves. When it comes to closing your talk, presentation, or pitch, you have to be bold. If you know this action or next step is going to help the person you’re pitching, you have to tell them. You have to say “I need you to do this,” with confidence. “If you know it’s going to help them, don’t be shy,” said Katie Wake, a presentation coach at Own The Room, a communication skills training company. It’s much harder to persuade someone to do something when you’re not confident in what you’re asking of them. When you have complete confidence that whatever it is you’re asking them to do is going to be good for them, it’s easier to sell whatever you’re trying to sell. So, think about how you’re going to close your presentation or pitch. What are you going to ask? How can you frame that ask in a way that makes your audience feel like you’re helping instead of selling? Want to increase your communication skills? Check out our course “How To Improve Your Communication Skills At Work” to become a better communicator and learn how to work with others more effectively.


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