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Do any of these apply to you:

  • You got fired for poor performance but don't agree with management about it.
  • You've got a DWI or felony conviction on your record.
  • You quit your last job in a rage and left them hanging.
  • Your last boss was a total jerk and let you go because you couldn't get along.
  • You were caught stealing and were let go.
  • You were accused of sexual harassment (but never convicted) and was let go.
  • You jumped jobs for several years and then got laid off and can't explain why you can't stay employed long-term.
m , mm These can be tough things to explain in an interview. Unfortunately, most job seekers don't know what to say (and what NOT to say) in each of these cases.

Click below to watch the 3 taped segments on how to deal with tough interview questions that deal with your past.

Segment #1

Segment #2

Segment #3

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