This is Why I Didn't Get the Job?

Dear J.T. & Dale: Recently, I was NOT hired for a freelance PowerPoint specialist job. During a follow-up conversation, I was told that the hiring manager did not believe I could create presentations containing 60 or more slides. As an expert in all things PowerPoint, I am rankled by the slide figure excuse. I would not work up to slide 59 and suddenly crash. Should I believe the explanation? - Sam J.T.: In today's market, there are hundreds of equally qualified applicants. This means hiring managers have to use very specific criteria to be able to choose one and set aside all the others. Think of it this way: You walk up to a display of apples in the supermarket. They all look great. Which one do you choose? You pick one. Then, if someone were to insist that you explain why you selected that particular one, you would find a way to rationalize the choice. DALE: I'm here sadly shaking my head, envisioning the "I am not an apple" mail you are going to get. However, I understand the point and want to focus on the key phrase "rationalize the choice." What would happen if we could sit down with the hiring manager and say, "Come on, do you really believe that Sam would keel over when he tried to go past 59 slides?" He'd say: "Of course not. But we do a lot of giant presentations, and his experience didn't include those, so we went with someone whose did." J.T.: And if we said to the manager, "Why 60?" he might chuckle and say, "I picked it out of the air as a typical long presentation." That is what it's like for hiring managers. They end up choosing in the moment, based on criteria that help them rationalize a difficult decision. DALE: So now, Sam, you get to the next application and you're going to be tempted to emphasize that you are a long-haul expert, capable of a hundred slides, even a thousand. And there's a good chance that it will cost you the job, because the next manager might well think as I do: "Anyone who creates a PowerPoint presentation that's more than 10 slides ought to have his computer set on fire." J.T.: Yes, there's a danger of trying to be everything to everyone. And, moreover, it's possible there were other factors about your candidacy that they didn't like. Employers don't have time to go into detail with each candidate as to why they were passed over. Not only does it take them away from their real job, but it opens a dialogue that has no happy or productive ending. So, chalk this up to an employer that you wouldn't want to work for anyway. DALE: Agreed. If they like their PowerPoint presentations long, they've probably missed the point. Feel free to send questions to J.T. and Dale via e-mail at advice@jtanddale.com or write to them in care of King Features Syndicate, 300 W. 57th Street, 15th Floor, New York, NY 10019. © 2012 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. Didn't get job image from Shutterstock

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Diane submitted. She has recently worked with a co-worker on a group project. When it came time to present the project at a meeting, Diane let her co-worker present. While it went great, the co-worker proceed to take credit for nearly all of Diane's work. Frustrating to say the least!

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In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if your co-worker took credit for the work you did...right in front of your colleagues AND boss!

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

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In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if witnessed a hiring manager at your organization making fun of a candidate who they had just interviewed who had autism.

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

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Fortunately, some companies have generous paternity leave policies that give new dads the ability to take time off of work to stay home with their child.

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During our weekly live Office Hours on YouTube, two of our coaches, Ariella Coombs and J.T. O'Donnell, answer questions live from viewers related to their job search, career success, on the job situations and more.

We complied a simple list of what we find to be the most common questions our coaches get about resumes. We hope you find this helpful.

Let's start with the basics...

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Back in March, we made the hard decision to change our private Facebook group of over 37 THOUSAND members to a fee-based only platform.

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