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When I was a sophomore in college, I took my first college-level journalism class. During that class, we were supposed to create a Twitter account and post on it regularly. Related: 4 Ways To Kick Up Your Job Search A Notch With Social Media I didn’t get it. Twitter, another dumb social media site, was required for a journalism class? Remember, this site was widely known for its users posting updates for every moment of their waking life. Updates like:

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There are numerous paths you may take and skills to learn when you choose to build a GIS career. At its core is a firm understanding of GIS software and technologies which will open the doors to many flavors of geography jobs because you possess very unique skills, including:

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The rapid pace of innovation has altered the career landscape, rendering some jobs nearly obsolete and creating entirely new media jobs that didn't exist a few years ago. This is especially true in the field of media, which has expanded from print, radio and television to encompass a new range of digital formats. New media professionals use the Internet to deliver information and entertainment in entirely new ways. Although the technology may be new, a combination of old-fashioned creativity, dedication, and hard work still pave the route to success. Here are five media jobs that didn't exist five years ago.

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When it comes to bachelor degrees, perhaps none provides more options than one in communications, often found in the College of Art and Sciences. To earn a communications degree, you need to develop and demonstrate the ability to write well, speak persuasively, understand human nature, and demonstrate an ability to use a variety of communications vehicles fluidly. As you can imagine, one or all of these skills are required for nearly any job, and you’ll find communication majors working in every industry. Here are a few:

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One of the perks of being a journalist is that you’re always meeting new people. Getting to know those people can help you build relationships and, consequently, lead you to contacts that could benefit you as a reporter in the long run. This article will tell you how to use your journalism tactics in networking. For me, interviewing new sources has always led to something positive. Whether it’s leading me to people who can make my article stand out or to a potential employer, talking and building a networking foundation with others has never hurt my evolving career.

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