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Beginning with the first "F" on the school report card, we are trained to fear failure.

That fear only grows larger as we become adults because the stakes become higher. While fear of failure is only natural, it's important to make sure that fear doesn't become debilitating. In fact, if you approach failure differently, it can be an asset.

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Some of you may ask, is there a difference between mentoring and managing? Well, I heard on a MSNBC news report a little while back saying that 85% of Gen Y interns expect to be mentored through their internship experience. And, more than that, they expect that mentorship to be meaningful, engaging, and beneficial to their future careers. The same report also indicated what Gen Y's don't expect is to be managed. Mentored, not managed. To those of us who work with Gen Y's daily, this distinction is no surprise. The surprise is there is now a real conversation taking place about these two very different approaches. So, what is the difference between mentoring and managing? According to Webster's Dictionary, to manage is "to handle or direct with a degree of skill; to make and keep compliant; to exercise executive, administrative, and supervisory direction." Adversely, to mentor is defined as "to serve as a trusted counselor or guide; to provide expertise to less experienced individuals; to build a relationship based upon communication." From the definitions, it seems apparent that these two supervisory methodologies are polar opposites, mutually exclusive. But do they have to be? Is today's "manager" in place to keep the staff compliant, on task, and focused on the bottom line? Is it possible for a manager to also be a mentor? Yes, it is not only possible, but for the success of most businesses today, especially those hiring in Gen Y's, it is imperative leadership blend both supervisory strategies into their methodology.

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