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1. The Smartest Person Always Gets The Job

Definitely not true – companies these days are more interested in the complete worker. Having brains is always an advantage, but it's not the only thing that hiring managers are looking for. In today’s economy, an employer wants to know that, if required, you are able to complete a wide range of jobs. Having transferable skills, a can do attitude and a willingness to learn and be involved in all aspects of the business is key to nailing the job interview.

2. Direct Experience Is Most Important

Transferable skills are key. In certain industries the job specification may require direct experience, but in many circumstances being able to show that you have the skills to succeed is just as important. Do not get discouraged if you feel that you lack the right skills to get a new job. Concentrate on the value added skills that you have and highlight these skills on your resume and in the job interview.

3. Dating A Co-Worker Will Lead To Career Doom

An urban myth. I have even heard of stories where dating the boss has resulted in career success (not recommended!). Always remember to perform your role to the highest quality and it does not matter who you decide to date! (Note: public displays of affection are a big no-no! – this type of behavior is best saved for non-work hours).

4. Applying For Jobs Online Is The Only Way To Find A New Job

Job searching online is one of many different approaches you should take. Before you even begin to apply for jobs, ensure that you have a professionally written resume. No matter how many jobs you apply for, it doesn't matter if your resume is not selling your skills. With the growth of social networking online, sites such as LinkedIn can be a fantastic way to approach people who you typically could not just pick up the phone and call.

5. Writing A Cover Letter Is A Waste Of Time

Every time you apply for a job you should accompany your resume with a targeted cover letter. The only exception is when the job specification clearly states not to send a cover letter. Most times, a hiring manager will read your cover letter before opening your resume. If your cover letter does not shine, there is a good chance your resume won’t even be opened. You may have the greatest resume written by a professional resume writer, but it means nothing if your cover letter is letting you down. Enjoy this article? You've got time for another! Check out these related articles:   Photo Credit: Shutterstock

If you Google “find your passion” you will get 39,000,000 hits. Go to the self-help section of any bookstore and you will see 50 or more volumes on finding your passion, following your passion, and living your passion. Every other Twitter bio or LinkedIn bio has a reference to “passionate about.” Passion, as they say, is the new black. So, I was hardly surprised when a young friend came to me for career advice, and started the conversation by saying, “My job stinks, I’m bored to tears. I just can’t figure out what my passion is.” She spoke as if somewhere, out there, is a single career-related purpose that, if she could but find it, would lead to eternal fulfillment. This was her fifth “it stinks” job in three years, and it was clear she had fallen for the passion myth.

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Major LinkedIn Myths

There is lots of advice out there on how to be successful on LinkedIn, here are the biggest LinkedIn myths you should know about! Before updating your profile be sure to read this first. LinkedIn settings are regularly misunderstood, educate yourself about the three most common myths. If you’re undertaking a confidential job search, every move you make on LinkedIn can feel dangerous. Suppose you update your profile and someone at work realizes you’re looking. What if your boss starts to notice what is going on? The best advice I can give is to be reasonably cautious, but relax. While some actions on LinkedIn ARE public, there are other notifications and settings that aren’t obvious to many users. In addition, LinkedIn changes its format, user account settings, and procedures so often that what used to be of great concern to job seekers has probably changed. A great example of this is your Contact settings, which are (still) ominous check boxes with options that you can select to show you are looking for a job, consulting offers, and so on. Previously, these were openly displayed on your profile, but I’m happy to report this has changed. So, if you are concerned about watching your tracks on LinkedIn, I recommend becoming familiar with its evolution, regularly checking in to find out if you can loosen some of the controls you may have been taught to use in the past. As outlined in my article, you’ll also realize which LinkedIn myths you may have bought into already – and gain insight on what truly will (and won’t) reveal your intent on LinkedIn.   READ FULL ARTICLE ►

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