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You submitted a great resume that got you an interview, and now you're preparing yourself for all sorts of “weird” HR and recruiter questions. But are you preparing the right way for negotiating your future salary? Many candidates are quite well prepared for the HR classics. For example,“What are your three key strengths and weaknesses” or “Where do you see yourself in five years?” But what about the big salary question? How are you making sure you don’t settle for $60,000 annually if the company had been willing to pay you $70,000 annually? If you look at this question over a period of 10 years, we are looking at $100,000 of potentially lost income. So, salary negotiation is certainly a point you don’t want to neglect in your career planning and development. Now, who is better at negotiating deals than anyone else? No, not the guys from the Pawn Stars show (I think those guys could actually make more money if they were better negotiators). The right answer is: attorneys!

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The last time you got hired, how did you negotiate? Well, if you're like 41% of Americans, you didn't negotiate at all. The truth is, your hiring manager expects you to negotiate; even if there isn't a lot of extra money available, negotiation is a standard part of the hiring process and one that shows your new employer that you understand how the working world works. This means that yes, by failing to negotiate at your current job means you probably left a few thousand dollars in salary on the table. It also means you probably left behind a few other choice benefits, such as extra vacation days. Negotiation, after all, isn't just about salary; it's about the entire compensation package. It is your job as a new hire to make sure you get the best possible package for yourself and any potential family members or loved ones. So, the next time you prepare to negotiate a job offer, remember to negotiate these key items in addition to your salary:

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