Woman negotiates a better salary at work
Bigstock

Although negotiating salary should come naturally to women, it's not usually the case. We are good at handling all sorts of negotiations at home—the contractor we hire for the bathroom renovation, the amount of screen time allowed to our teenager if grades improve, the next vacation spot—but when it comes to negotiating salary, we're not that great.


I would contend, however, that women in particular have all the critical skills necessary for successful negotiations in the workplace, top among which is negotiating salary. We're consensus builders, emphatic, good listeners, and we have a collaborative style.

The problem is that, too often, we don't manage our careers as closely as we should and in not doing so we leave money on the table.

Why does this happen?

    Reasons Why Women Stay Away From Salary Negotiations

    Manager looks at his colleague during a salary negotiation meeting

    Bigstock

    According to research, there are a few key reasons why we stay away from negotiation situations:

    • Women perceive their circumstances as being fixed, out of their control, unlike men who believe that everything is negotiable. Therefore, they don't attempt to negotiate for themselves. (Too often, women don't even try to negotiate a salary offer. They just take it.)
    • Women's sense of entitlement is not as strong as men's. Ask any man or woman what they should get paid for completing a task and notice how the woman's answer is usually less than the man's.
    • Women don't lobby for pay raises as much and as often as men do. When raises occur, managers tend to give money to those who asked for it—usually men—and give a smaller share (if any at all!) to the women who didn't ask.

    How To Change Things Around

    Professional woman successfully negotiates a higher salary

    Bigstock

    If you are committed to your career and are serious about being recognized for your work, you will have to engage in negotiations along the way. Nobody will do it for you, so you might as well give it all you've got.

    Here are a few things you can start doing right now:

    • Establish clear career goals for yourself and ask for what you need and what you want. This is harder to do if you are not sure of where you wish to take your career.
    • Check how much people in your industry and in similar positions with equivalent knowledge and experience are making. If you want to negotiate from a position of strength, it is critical to know where you stand in relation to your peers.
    • Before you meet with your boss to negotiate salary, make a list of what you're willing to give up and what's non-negotiable. Knowing your walk away point will help you discuss terms more easily.
    • Learn how to talk about your achievements in relation to how they affect your company's bottom line. Whenever possible use numbers to quantify your accomplishments.
    • Anticipate questions that your boss will ask and work from a win-win perspective. What's important to your manager? Why do they need you? What is the current demand for your position in the market?
    • See the potential to negotiate everything and everywhere both personally and professionally. Negotiating salary is never only about how much you make. Health benefits, flexible time, title, working from home, expense account, an assistant, and so on, are all items that you should consider negotiable.
    Download Work It Daily\u2019s free job search checklist

    This is not your grandmother's workplace. It's yours. It's more flexible than even a few years ago, and companies everywhere are struggling to help their women advance. Let's do what is in our hands to make sure we continue landing positions of leadership and that along the way we are compensated for our efforts as much as our male counterparts.


    Need help negotiating the salary you deserve? We're here for you!

    Check out our FREE resources page and Live Events Calendar.

    Or, join our career growth club today and get access to one-on-one career coaching, resume and cover letter reviews, online tutorials, and unlimited networking opportunities—all in your back pocket!

    If you want FREE career advice in your inbox, subscribe to our newsletter The Daily Dose!


    This post was originally published at an earlier date.

    Get Some Leverage
    Sign up for The Work It Daily Newsletter
    Follow
    Data analytics concept
    iStock
    One of the pillars of an exemplary data management and governance program is data literacy. Organizations often assume that their executives or data users are not data literate and don't understand how to ensure data is of quality and how everyone has a role in creating and managing data. Internal branding about how data helps management make better decisions has been around for a decade. But to go from data to information and knowledge, data literacy is not enough for the clients of data analytics practitioners. Business data analytics users need accurate multi-disciplinary skills to ask themselves what the data tells us and where and how these insights can be applied.
    Read moreShow less
    Teacher stands in his classroom
    Bigstock

    Within the United States, many state departments of education are lowering teacher certification requirements to meet the demands of the current teacher shortage. In New Jersey, for example, aspiring educators no longer need to take PRAXIS exams. In Arizona, people are now allowed to teach in school with just a high school diploma (and current enrollment in university). In New Mexico, the National Guard has been activated as substitute teachers.

    Read moreShow less
    Featured