How To Customize Your Resume

Sometimes there’s the thinking that stuffing a resume with a wide range of skills and experience will do the trick, but an overstuffed resume can dilute the message of how you make a perfect fit for the job. Related: 3 Tips For Building A Resume That Makes Your Phone Ring To captivate a hiring manager’s attention, you need a customized resume that is specific to the job. To customize your resume for the job:


Think of your resume as a search engine with results.

The key is not to bombard you resume with information that is irrelevant to the job, but to be as specific and relevant as possible. The most relevant information always comes up at the top of the search engine and that’s what you have to do on your resume. Make it easy for a hiring manager to identify why you make the perfect match for the job.

Narrow your focus.

You want your resume to showcase that you’re a specialist and expert in the field of work, not a generalist. As hard to believe as it may be, that’s the truth in the case of resumes. Remember, your resume is there to help get your foot in the door of the employer. You have to first understand what the employer is looking for and specifically address that need for them to want to talk to you. If you come off saying you can do everything else, it can impact your message from getting across in those quick seconds that a hiring manager takes to review your resume. Carefully review the job posting to really understand what the employer is looking for and focus your resume to address those specific points.

Think like an employer.

Put yourself in the employer’s position to answer the key questions they have, like:
  • “What can you do for me?”
  • “How is your experience relevant to the job?”
  • “Do you have examples to demonstrate you’ve succeed at doing it?”
  • “Are you able to achieve those results again on this job?”
You can expect better results with your resume when it’s tailored to an employer’s specific need. And remember, employers receive more resumes than they need to go through, so when your resume requires digging for relevant information, you’ve already lost them.

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3 Keys To Customizing Your Resume 5 Key Areas To Target When Branding Your Resume How To Match Your Skills To A Job With Your Resume

About the author

Don Goodman’s firm was rated as the #1 Resume Writing Service in 2013 & 2014. Don is a triple-certified, nationally recognized Expert Resume Writer, Career Management Coach and Job Search Strategist who has helped thousands of people secure their next job. Check out his Resume Writing Service. Get a Free Resume Evaluation or call him at 800.909.0109 for more information. Disclosure: This post is sponsored by a CAREEREALISM-approved expert. You can learn more about expert posts here. Photo Credit: Shutterstock

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