How To Effectively Demonstrate Your Value In A Job Interview

In my recruitment job, I’ve noticed that one of the most common reasons for candidates getting rejected after their interviews is that they don’t provide enough relevant, tangible examples of what they’ve done in their current/previous job that would be relevant to the position they are applying for. Related: 5 Things To Ask In A Job Interview When you’re looking for a new job, you need to provide specific concrete examples of the competencies listed on a job description – whether it is problem solving, influencing, taking initiative, or managing change. What a lot my interview coaching clients do is to either give quite generic examples or just talk about what they’ve done - but without mentioning specific accomplishments. Do you feel that this describes you? You are probably very good at your job and could do it with your eyes closed. Yet, you struggle to demonstrate your expertise effectively in a job interview. Here are a few tips to help you overcome any blocks you might have about talking about your achievements:


Get over the idea that you’re bragging.

One of the reasons candidates shy away from talking about their accomplishments is because they don’t want to sound arrogant. However, the job interview isn’t the time to be too humble. Talking about your accomplishments and using facts and numbers isn’t bragging – it's telling a story. You have to remember that a potential employer wants you to do well in an interview – they are literally looking for an excuse to give out the job! So tell them what they need in a clear, factual manner.

Use STAR or CAR format when giving examples.

STAR (Situation, Task, Action, Result) or CAR (Challenge, Action, Result) Prepare a few examples of how you’ve solved problems, and dealt with different challenges and failures of what you’ve achieved using the above format.

Use numbers to your advantage.

Numbers are great for demonstrating your skills and expertise. Did you increase revenue, or save time/money? Did you improve a procedure and, if so, how much time did you save? How many clients did you win in your last job? Don’t just tell the employer what the result was – tell them how you got the result and what your decision making process was. Prepare several examples for your next job interview and you’ll significantly increase your chances of getting that job offer! To find out how recruiters read resumes, what mistakes job seekers make that stop them from being hired, how to answer even the most difficult interview questions and how to negotiate your best salary yet, download my FREE 5-Day Video Course “You’re HIRED!” here.

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