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Job advertisements sometimes ask you to specify salary requirements when submitting your cover letter. If a job posting requires you to address salary requirements in cover letter or resume form, not all is lost. Related: 7 Examples Of Fresh New Ways To Start Your Cover Letter But, many job seekers feel uncomfortable revealing their desired salary before they've even scheduled an interview. If you’re one of those people, don’t worry—there are some ways to comply with the employer’s request while avoiding having to immediately provide a specific answer. One technique for addressing this topic in a cover letter is to list a range of salaries you've earned throughout your career. For those who have been in the workforce for a while, it is common for this range to be fairly wide. So you could say, “ I've earned between $50,000-$75,000 in previous positions, and I would be happy to discuss salary after an interview.” Another way to address the issue is to offer a ballpark figure. For instance, you could say, “My current salary is in the low six figures.” Or, “My current compensation, including bonuses, is in the $80s.” Remember to factor in bonuses, 401(k) matching, mileage reimbursement, and other additional forms of compensation when providing them with a number. Sometimes employers will specifically ask you what you earn in your current position. Non-employee workers (subcontractors) can easily avoid this question by stating, “As a contractor, my compensation varies from month to month.” If you suspect a position for which you’re applying pays less than you currently earn, you can say, “My current salary is $65,000, but I am willing to negotiate if that is out of the hiring range for this position.” When asked about salary, the most important thing is to not sell yourself short. Unless the number you stipulate is significantly above what an employer is willing to pay, it shouldn’t prevent you from getting an interview. In addition, providing a somewhat general answer about salary requirements can aid you in appearing flexible and willing to negotiate. This post was originally published at an earlier date.

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Negotiating can be tough, but it’s necessary in many situations. Whether you landed a new job, asked for a raise, or bought a car, you’ve likely had to negotiate at some point. QUIZ: What Kind Of Networker Are You? But what kind negotiator are YOU? Are you a negotiating pro or do your skills need a little work? Take this quiz to find out!

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Every individual wants to find (and stick to) a great job. But the question about salary is always raised. The moment you get the interview, you start to make all sorts of preparations. Once you are done with your first round and called for the second round, you are confident enough to impress the board with your credentials and skills. You are aware that they really want to hire you. But the problem you encounter is this: you would like to ask for a salary that's more than they are prepared to offer. So, how do you persuade the decision makers to offer you a higher salary even when they know you are less experienced? Here are some tips for negotiating a higher salary when limited experience.

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When I say the word "negotiation," what pops into your head? More often than not, it's probably a sense of unease. (Something like the first scene of the movie, Wedding Crashers comes to mind.) Related: Why You Need To Negotiate More Than Just Your Salary Yet, the truth is, most of us negotiate almost every day with friends, family, and colleagues. They aren't life or death decisions, but chances are you're regularly negotiating aspects of your relationships with everyone you interact with.

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