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Detoxing is a popular subject. The term is used nowadays to refer to eliminating things that aren’t good for us and affect us negatively. Usually it’s in the context of your physical health. Related: 7 Ways To Stay Productive At Work But perhaps it shouldn’t be limited to that. Have you ever thought about eliminating some of the ‘toxins’ affecting your work life? Are there any aspects of your work environment that could do with some attention? Do you have any particularly toxic behaviors, habits or routines that are holding you back or making you less productive? And if so, what can you do about them?

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Organization is a pain, but the simple truth of the matter is organized people get more done. Why? Generally speaking, they have better time management, live with less mess and get in less trouble. If you want to decrease the mistakes you make and stop getting in your own way the only real option is to become organized. Related: 5 Productivity-Sucking Snags To Avoid At Work It's easier said than done certainly, but if you follow a few simple steps you can earn a lasting result - provided you’re ready to commit long term!

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Executive coaching clients who have worked with me have heard me encourage them - time and again - to begin their week with a well-thought-out weekly planning process. A process that I first embedded into my weekly routine after reading David Allen's best seller on time management and planning, Getting Things Done, years ago. Related: Time Management: 4 Keys To Avoiding Work-Related Stress My weekly planning process allows me to enter each week feeling "in control." Not only that, but it also gives me confidence that I am focusing on the most important things in my life - my work life and my personal life - THAT week. My weekly planning process includes review of a number of lists and tools, my calendar, my goals, my Inboxes, messages, written notes, and so on - a whole host of items that allow me to scan across my entire horizon of open loops, action-centric matters, and goals. Two lists that I ALWAYS include in my weekly review and planning process are: 1.) my "Never" or "Absolute No" List, and 2.) my "Always" or "100% Commitment" List. These are two lists of promises I've made to myself that are in total alignment with my beliefs, personal vision, work, personal goals and objectives. Reviewing these two lists on a weekly basis flexes my awareness muscle and helps keep me conscious of these important promises.

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Executive coaching clients who have worked with me have heard me encourage them - time and again - to begin their week with a well-thought-out weekly planning process. A process that I first embedded into my weekly routine after reading David Allen's best seller on time management and planning, Getting Things Done, years ago. Related: Time Management: 4 Keys To Avoiding Work-Related Stress My weekly planning process allows me to enter each week feeling "in control." Not only that, but it also gives me confidence that I am focusing on the most important things in my life - my work life and my personal life - THAT week. My weekly planning process includes review of a number of lists and tools, my calendar, my goals, my Inboxes, messages, written notes, and so on - a whole host of items that allow me to scan across my entire horizon of open loops, action-centric matters, and goals. Two lists that I ALWAYS include in my weekly review and planning process are: 1.) my "Never" or "Absolute No" List, and 2.) my "Always" or "100% Commitment" List. These are two lists of promises I've made to myself that are in total alignment with my beliefs, personal vision, work, personal goals and objectives. Reviewing these two lists on a weekly basis flexes my awareness muscle and helps keep me conscious of these important promises.

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