Less energy, high health and life insurance costs, higher salary expectations, and unwillingness to learn new technology. A study released by the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College indicated many companies have reservations about hiring older workers because of these preconceived notions. There was a time when age discrimination conjured visual images of men and women nearing the retirement age of 62 and older. However, with the increasing impact of technology advancement, the changing workplace, globalization, and economic instability, age discrimination has crept into the lives of working professionals as young as 40. These qualified candidates are finding their job search takes twice as long as their younger counterparts and they often have to settle for a salary decrease or a lower level position. So, if you are over 40 and have been unexpectedly thrust into unemployment, how can you find success? Overcoming the barriers of age discrimination takes persistence, dedication, a positive attitude and employing this proven career success strategy.

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If your job search strategy keeps running into a brick wall whenever you send out your executive resume, or you're repeatedly receiving phone calls for lower paying positions that are below your capabilities, it may be time to re-examine your executive resume layout. One of the main things to remember is your executive resume is a strategic marketing tool and its main objective should be a “Sell Me” not “Tell Me” document. Creating a laundry list of job responsibilities and task-driven statements, on your executive resume only tells readers what you get paid to do. However, hiring managers and executive recruiters are interested in learning more about what you can do for them – the best way to highlight and illustrate that is through your qualifications, expertise, personal brand, length and breadth of experience, and bottom-line impact and quantifiable results. So, how do you make sure you are communicating all these factors in an executive resume? Here are seven steps to an attention-getting executive resume.

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When you are in the hot seat for a new job, employers, hiring managers, and recruiters all want to know the same thing—what can you offer? For senior-level professionals, your quantifiable, high-impact accomplishments give companies a snapshot of your unique tangible value. So, if your executive resume lacks the WOW factor, you are not doing a great job of marketing yourself. In order to take a career accomplishment from average to outstanding, you need to set the stage for the reader. For example: Increased annual sales 25% in 2006. At first glance, this accomplishment appears impressive, however, there are several questions that should be addressed. What was the sales growth prior to 2006, what actions or activities directly impacted the company’s sales or was the company going through any changes/transitions during 2006? The answer to one or more of these questions can cast a whole new light on the original accomplishment statement.

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