It takes a special kind of person to become a top CEO, but what is the magic formula? This infographic explores the education backgrounds, the experience levels and the personal characteristics that shape the CEOs of the world today – while providing a glimpse at what the future holds for the CEO of tomorrow. Related: 5 Things To Consider Before You Take That Management Job While many of the world’s most famous CEOs, like Richard Branson and Mark Zuckerberg, are renowned for not having finished third level education an overwhelming majority of CEOs (97%) have a bachelor’s degree. Three in ten CEOs have an MBA, whereas only 2.4% of CEOs have no degree. When it comes to producing CEOs, Harvard takes top spot, with 65 of the Fortune 500 CEOs having matriculated. While many CEOs have varying educational backgrounds their personality traits tend to fall into line. Most CEOs are classified as good communicators, calculated risk takers, shrewd deal makers, and extroverts who are innovative, have vision and command respect. Overwhelmingly CEOs tend to be male. Today, there are only 24 female CEOs in the Fortune 500 and 27 in the Fortune 1000, meaning that women make up under 5% of all CEOs. Current trends provide us with a glimpse of the CEO of the future. Today, three in five college students in the United States are women, and 40% of MBA students are female. Industry experts view this as an indicator that increasingly women are going to step into CEO roles with more frequency in the future. It is expected that by 2040 three in ten CEOs will be women. While the closing of the gender gap will be a major feature of the CEO of tomorrow, there are other assets that future CEOs will possess that will set them apart from CEOs of today. A much deeper knowledge of technology will be required, and the CEO of the future will be more connected than ever before. Transparency has become a major issue in business, and the CEO of the future will be held to high level of accountability. Additionally, the young workforce of today is more connect, varied and innovative than ever before. Future CEOs will have a much boarder range of both work and life experience, and will have substantial experience working in virtual teams. This is a guest post.

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Having a high-paying job is the dream, but you may find the realities and worldwide statistics surprising. We explore which career areas pay the best, look at pay disparities on a global scale, and look at which high-paying jobs come at a price. Related: 7 Degrees That Lead To High-Paying Careers It may come as no surprise to find that a career in the medical sector, with high-paying medical salaries reaching as high as £401,000. While doctors and medical specialists lead the field in high salaries, they are followed closely by Directors and CEOs, who take in around £397,000 per annum. If you’re lucky enough to snag a high-paying career in the banking sector you can expect to earn £351,000, while highly paid workers in the legal sector earn approximately £302,000 early. High-paid software engineers follow closely behind with £237,000 per annum, and highly paid airline pilots and executives earn around £200,000 a year. If you become a high paid scientist you could earn up to £150,000 a year and the only area that isn’t in six figures in our top eight list are those in government, who earn approximately £93,000 per annum. While these are worldwide figures, each individual country differs on who pays the best. In the UK, those in the banking sector top the pile, while medical practitioners are the most highly paid sector in the United States. In France, you’ll earn the most if you are a CEO of a successful company, similarly in German this is the best field to move into if you want to be a highly paid worker. In Australia, a career in the legal profession is your best bet to top the highest paid list, while being a CEO in China, South Africa, and India is the best way to earn big money. While there are many high-paying jobs, some high-paid careers come at a price. Coal mining is a well-paying job with workers looking to take home £2,000 per month, however, the day to day work is hazardous with approximately 190 workers losing their lives in the line of work annually. Similarly oil workers are handsomely rewarded for their time, however, each year an average of 120 people lose their lives while working in the oil and gas extraction industry.

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