Recently I have heard many stories of difficult work environments. The new workforce appreciates a sense of autonomy so feeling micromanaged can feel uncomfortable. How can you challenge management style when you are new at work? Related: 9 Strategies For Dealing With A Passive Aggressive Boss Here are three tips for working with a micromanager:

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When you find a job you’d like to apply for, how do you approach writing your cover letter? If you’re like most people, it’s with a groan of apprehension rather than a skip and a hop up of elation. You don’t have to be a wordsmith to write a great cover letter. You just need to understand is what motives the employer is seeking to accomplish in hiring this position. Related: How To Write A Hot Cover Letter What in no means ever motivates an employer, is your increased learning and success. Employers are not interested in what the position will do for you or what working for their organization will do for your career. They don’t care about how you will learn and grow under their tutelage. Even if you are seeking an internship which by definition is a learning opportunity, internship supervisors have a definite agenda for what will be accomplished for them and their organization. Instead of following a boring form template where employers are encouraged to skip to the second paragraph, show your passion up front. They likely know what position you are applying for. Instead of stating it up front, talk about your connection to the company or position. You want to get them interested in you from ‘hello’ so that they feel compelled to continue reading. Try to create an emotional connection through storytelling. If you are looking to be a financial advisor, dig into your personal experiences to demonstrate passion and commitment. Example:

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Being nervous is a natural human condition. It is also beneficial to performance. When we really want something, we get nervous. Related: Why You Need To Change Your Job Search Behavior I was a high school teacher for six years. This was not my first career. Before my first teaching year began, I remember talking to my best friend who is also a human behavior specialist. I told her my fears. I told her that I was nervous that I would not be a good enough teacher. What she told me made me change the way I viewed nervousness forever. She said, “Being nervous is a good thing. If you didn’t care, you wouldn’t be nervous. Because you are nervous about being good enough, I am certain that you will be good enough and probably even better.” Being nervous is a great way to assess how much you have vested in an opportunity or venture. For example, if you are not nervous before an interview, you may not be truly interested in the job or company. Recognizing nervousness and directing the energy can be a huge benefit to job searching. Employers are looking for employees who will be engaged at work. Studies show that 80% of employees are disengaged. They are looking for that unicorn that will come into the office each and every day excited to get started and happy to be a part of the team. If you walk into an interview as cool as a cucumber, what does that convey to a potential employer? So, if you are nervous, good for you! An interview is a big deal. You only get seven seconds to make a good first impression and that’s not much. You have to earn your position and the interview is just the first step. Remember, hiring is discrimination. Interviews are a huge part of your professional career so it’s worth harnessing all of your energy to prepare. Being nervous is a sign that something is important to you. If an interview is the cause of your nerves, take that energy and put it into preparing for your interview. What part of the interview worries you? If you think you do not have enough qualifications, recognize you have enough to get you in the door. Look at the job description, write down all of the qualifications they are looking for and then brainstorm a list of things you have done that prove you meet those qualifications and write them down. This is a great exercise for building interview confidence and being prepared. And it doesn’t stop there. You want to know all you can about the company so you can walk in the door and show them why you would make a great team member. Are you a match for the company culture? Show you are by acting and dressing the part. If you find that you are not nervous about a pending interview, assess what this lack of jitters could mean. Are you not interested or are you overly confident? Either is a poor attitude to walk in the door with. If you are overly confident, dot your i’s and cross your t’s to make sure you are truly prepared. Rehearse interview questions and study company culture. If you are not interested, it’s time to assess what you want out of your next job and what kind of company you would like to partner with. Need more interview guidance? I have many ideas for helping you prepare! Check out my coaching page and free resources to get you started.

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Recently, I was stuck in a traffic jam getting on the highway. It is orange barrel season (did it ever end?) and it’s no surprise to encounter road work around every corner and on nearly every major thorough fare. Related: 3 Job Search Secrets The Best Employers Wish You Knew What struck me is that this traffic was not actually due to construction in progress. Drivers were literally slamming on their brakes to slow down to 25mph. Have you ever seen people so eager to comply during rush hour? Well, a little device called Photo Traffic Control had successfully modified driver behavior on this bit of highway. For months a photo van had been installed there. Now there is none because it has effectively done its job. Are you tired of unsuccessfully searching for a job or career change? It may be time to change your job search behavior. There are many open positions posted on the internet but research shows these jobs are not the low hanging fruit they appear to be. 80% of jobs are gotten through networking yet many people refuse to believe it. How could this be possible?! More importantly, how is it possible you have not modified your job search behavior to include growing and using your network? Finding career satisfaction takes work. It’s time to modify your behavior. What is your motivator? Get in touch with your motivator, write it down, journal about it daily and then get to work. It may be the satisfaction of a new job that best utilizes your skill set or it may be your dwindling savings account. Whatever it is, recognize it and set yourself up for the job search modification necessary to achieve positive results. Keep motivated in the job search by being a good boss. Be sure to create some positive stimulators and treat yourself for the positive changes you make to your job search. For example, each time you go to a networking event set a goal. If your goal is to make 3 new connections and you do so successfully, time for a reward! If you speed through the networking event and exit before making those three connections, maybe a hefty fine is what you need to modify that behavior! Need some ideas for job search modification? Check out free tools to help get started at CareerHMO.

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