With a dwindling market, the way you job search and present yourself to potential employers is a job, itself. For every job you apply for, there could be any number of other candidates just as qualified or more qualified than you. Providing potential employers with less than a stellar resume will only hurt your chances of getting the job, if the hiring manager even gives your resume a second glance.

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Using the correct body language during an interview is essential to your success. Body language communicates a lot of information about you, no matter what words come out of your mouth. Employers pay attention to how you dress and behave during the interview process because they want to get a better sense about you as a person in general. Body language is so important - an employer may decide to hire if you present yourself properly, but they may also decide not to hire if you if you have poor body language. Here are some tips about body language during an interview.

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Getting a job interview puts you one step closer to the job you want, and yet the smallest details can make or break your chances of getting your foot in the door. Whether you're interviewing for an administrative assistant job or for a CEO position, keep these all-important details in mind for a succesful interview that will put you at the top of the list. Here are the best interview tips for any job:

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If you want to make your resume the absolute best it can be, you will have to include one critical piece of information on your resume: Your value to the company. That’s the number one quality employers look for in a resume. What value will you bring to the company if you’re hired? Your experience may be ideal, your education may be tops, and your work history may be spotless, but it’s your value that determines whether or not you’ll land a job. Look at the simple logic behind this element of a resume. A company is looking for an individual who can help make a profit. This is why it’s critical to show a potential employer the value you can add to a company. For example, if you developed a management technique that made your previous company more proficient in filling customer orders, include that in your resume. What you did to add value to your previous employer can be simple. You mastered a technique in Dreamweaver that allows you to create CSS layouts quickly and without source code errors. This skill allowed your previous employer to get a web page up in half the time of the industry standard. That’s great. Highlight that skill in your resume. The company will understand your skill adds value. Emphasize you have a provable skill that can make the company money. Companies hire people who can increase their profit. Employees reward these people well. Write this value element in your cover letter. Don’t bury it in the middle of the resume employment section. Present it front and center to the hiring manager who’s reading the resume. Make sure the value element is the first thing he sees. Here’s why: You have 20 to 30 seconds to impress the hiring manager who’s reading the resumes. That’s all the time you get to impress an employer that you’re the best fit for the job. Surveys of hiring managers show these people are under pressure to hire the right person fast. Your first impression will determine whether your resume is thrown on the reject pile or set aside for a second look. Don’t fill your cover letter with boring clichés, such as “hard working” or “team player.” These clichés mean nothing. Tell that company what your value is immediately. This simple technique of highlighting your value will make your resume as good as possible and increase your chances of landing that job. Photo Credit: Shutterstock