Using The Correct Body Language During An Interview

Using the correct body language during an interview is essential to your success. Body language communicates a lot of information about you, no matter what words come out of your mouth. Employers pay attention to how you dress and behave during the interview process because they want to get a better sense about you as a person in general. Body language is so important - an employer may decide to hire if you present yourself properly, but they may also decide not to hire if you if you have poor body language. Here are some tips about body language during an interview.


1. Firm Handshake

The first thing you should do is give a firm handshake to the interviewer. A weak handshake will have a poor reflection on you and it may make people see you untrustworthy or unreliable. There is no need to crush the interviewer's hand, but the handshake should be firm and show you are alive.

2. Good Posture

Good posture will show the interviewer that you are prepared, professional, and confident. Sit straight in the chair and keep your head high as you walk. Do not let the interviewer see you slouched in the chair while you are waiting, so stay on your best behavior even when you think they are not watching. The secretary that you encounter before the interview may even take some notes about you before you even realize it.

3. No Fidgeting

Fidgeting makes you seem nervous and it can show a lack of self-esteem and confidence. Although you probably are nervous during the interview, it is best that you try your best not to show it. Do not tap your feet, play with your hair or nails, or rock in the chair before or during the interview.

4. Strong Eye Contact

Always maintain strong eye contact during the entire interview. A lack of eye contact can ruin your interview because it can make you seem untrustworthy. Simply look the interviewer in the eye while they are speaking and nod your head to acknowledge that you are listening to them.

5. Smile

Smiling can really help you during the interview because it can make you seem more friendly and likable. There is no need to smile during the entire interview because it could make you seem phony, but you should aim to smile at least once or twice during the interview. Watch your body language during the interview to make sure you leave a good impression after the interview. Photo Credit: Shutterstock

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