Dear Experts, In an interview for a SALES position, how do you ask questions designed to read whether the company is offering an ethical sales position or not, or being ethical as a company? I am looking for a second job and I just landed an interview in outside sales, and I want to make sure I'm not landing into a problem muck. The guy seems to be selling the company to me awfully hard, and even now I still have questions whether I should accept the position due to this, and also due to the fact some thing in his sales pitch does not match the portfolio of work (it's a design services agency) on their company website. Here is how our CAREEREALISM-Approved Experts answered this question on Twitter:Q#399 "When there is doubt, there is no doubt." [Robert De Niro in Ronin] (@teenarose) Q#399 If alarm bells are going off in your head, you should go with your gut feel... (@gradversity) Q#399 If you're going to be selling something, you have to believe in it. People can tell when you're faking. (@beneubanks) Q#399 If co offers base pay+ commission, better chance reputable. Find/ask pple on LinkedIn who wk/wkd there. (@juliaerickson) Q#399 1) Gut feelings seldom wrong. 2) Google the company. Search "co name AND scam". Glassdoor.com also good for research. (@DawnBugni) Our Twitter Advice Project (T.A.P.) is no longer an active campaign. To find an answer to the above question, please use the "Search" box in the right-hand column of this website.

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