When most people think of Nike, they think of shoes, retail stores, and, of course, athletes. That's all true, but there's more. Behind Nike's walls, you'll find the doers and thinkers who design, create, and innovate every day. There are also data scientists who discover and leverage athlete insights to create the future of sport.

You might be surprised to learn about the impact you can have in Data & Analytics at Nike versus at a major tech giant. Nike employees get to work on a wide array of challenges, so if you're obsessed with math, science, computers, and/or data, and you love sport, these stories may inspire you to work at Nike.

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When you’re unemployed, the thought of answering the simple question “What do you do?” can seem so daunting. What do you say? How can you answer the question without feeling embarrassed about your situation? What can you say to impress the person you’re talking to? First off, don’t feel embarrassed about being unemployed. Being in-between jobs isn’t anything to be ashamed of. Instead of saying “Right now, I’m unemployed but I’m looking for opportunities in the marketing space,” get more specific so the other person clearly understands how you add value. You can do that by using your branding statement. Your branding statement should be relatively short and answer three questions:

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Lately, we’ve been getting lots of questions around looking for work when you’re employed. One question that keeps popping up is, “Is it ever okay to tell your boss that you’re looking for work? I have a great relationship with my manager, and I don’t want to blindside him. I also think he’d be a great reference.” Here at Work It Daily, we don't advise telling an existing manager you’re looking for work… regardless of your relationship with him or her. It's better to tell employers that you’ll provide your manager or boss as a reference once you’re given an offer and accept it, and that the employer can make the offer pending the reference check. The reality is, the moment you tell your boss you’re looking, he or she will likely be upset and want to let you go… often before you have a new job. Don’t put yourself in a bad position. You might feel like you have a great relationship with your boss, but the fact is, you don’t want to risk getting let go before you’re ready.

Not sure how to get rehired at your former employer? Have you tried applying to jobs at the company with no success? People go back to their old companies all of the time. However, knowing how to do it effectively will save you time and potential frustration. Before you do anything, you need to call the HR department at this company and ask if you’re even eligible for rehire. They will tell you whether or not it’s worth applying based on your file. If they tell you that you’re eligible, ask about the best way to be considered for future roles. This will help you figure out the best strategy when it comes to applying for opportunities at this company. Then, try reaching out to colleagues to explain that you checked with HR so they know they have permission to speak with you. This will make it easier for you to get back into the company and reconnect with your former colleagues.

It’s inevitable. You’re going to experience some pretty awkward situations at networking events during your lifetime - no matter how comfortable, cool, and collected you may be. In fact, you might be the suavest professional at the party, but if you don’t know how to handle the following situations, you can find yourself in some pretty tough spots. You don't have to be James Bond to be suave, but you do need to know how to handle these awkward situations (because they happen to all of us).

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