Cover Letter

Quick Tip: Use 'Dear Hiring Team' On Your Cover Letter

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You’ve always been told that you shouldn’t write, “To Whom It May Concern,” on your cover letter. But what should you do when you don’t have the name of the hiring manager?


First, Track Down The Name

Obviously, it’s ideal to use the hiring manager’s name in your cover letter. So, the first thing you should do is try to track down the hiring manager’s name online (i.e., the company website, LinkedIn, Twitter, etc.).

You can also call up the company directly to ask for the name. Simply call up the company and say, “Hi, my name is ____ and I’m applying for a position at your company. Would it be possible for me to get the name of the hiring manager so I can address him or her in my cover letter?”

If All Fails, Use 'Dear Hiring Team'

Man looks at his cover letter while on his laptop

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If the hiring manager’s name is nowhere to be found and the company is unwilling to give you his or her name, you should use “Dear Hiring Team” in your cover letter salutation. By addressing your cover letter to the hiring team, you increase your chances of getting it in front of the right pair of eyes.

Why Can't You Use Someone Else's Name?

Woman reads her cover letter on her laptop

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But what if you know the name of someone else (not involved with hiring) who works at the company? Can you just address it to them instead?

Absolutely not!

“That person may not be the person that’s hiring, and they could easily throw [your cover letter] in the trash,” says J.T. O’Donnell, founder and CEO of Work It Daily. “You don’t know if they’re going to forward it to the right person or not. You DO NOT want to risk that.”

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This article was originally published at an earlier date.

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