Man writes a cover letter that asks for the job interview
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Is there one thing you can say in a cover letter that will guarantee it accomplishes its purpose? Absolutely!


A cover letter serves as an introduction to your resume and to yourself as a candidate for employment. It's the place to show your interest in the position, and make a personal connection between who you are and why you're a great fit for the opportunity.

Showing your interest and passion for the company is important in the cover letter. However, saying this ONE thing is almost an ultimate guarantee you'll get the interview.

Ask For It

Woman writes a cover letter that asks for the job interview

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You know that old saying, "Ask and you shall receive"? It's true. It may sound like common sense and obvious advice, but how many times have you sent a cover letter with your resume and not asked for the interview? It's easy to do!

In the closing paragraph of your cover letter, all you need to do is ask the employer for the interview. Statistics have indicated job seekers who ASK for the interview in their cover letters are twice as likely to GET the interview.

Below, we give you several examples that you can modify and use in your own cover letter.

How To Ask For A Job Interview In Your Cover Letter

Job seeker writes a cover letter

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Ending #1

I'm excited about the Director of Sales position with XYZ Widgets and would love the opportunity to meet in person to further discuss my experience and the value I can offer you as your next Director of Sales. Please call me at 555.555.5555 to schedule an interview at your earliest convenience.

Ending #2

I would love a personal interview at your earliest convenience to further discuss my credentials with you. I can be reached at 555.555.5555 and will follow up as well to make sure you've received my information.

Ending #3

Thank you for your time reviewing my resume. I welcome the opportunity to discuss in a personal interview my qualifications and fit for the position. Feel free to reach me at 555.555.5555 at your earliest convenience.

Ending #4

Thank you for your time and consideration. I'd love the opportunity to further discuss the position and my experience with you. Please reach out to me at 555.555.5555 to schedule an interview.

Remember: you can ask for the interview with any wording you're comfortable with, whether that's with more direct language or not. The key thing is to close your cover letter by asking for the interview.

A cover letter is your chance to connect with an employer and explain your passion for what they do and how you believe you can help them achieve their goals as a company. If you do all that and ask for the job interview at the end of your cover letter, you'll be much more likely to get a call from the hiring manager.

We know how difficult it can be to write a cover letter, especially when there's so much conflicting advice out there. If you need more help writing cover letters in your job search, we're here for you.

We'd love it if you joined our FREE community. It’s a private, online platform where workers, just like you, are coming together to learn and grow into powerful Workplace Renegades. More importantly, we have tons of resources inside our community that can help you write a cover letter—the right way.

It's time to find work that makes you feel happy, satisfied, and fulfilled. Join our FREE community today to finally become an empowered business-of-one!

This article was originally published at an earlier date.

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