Cover Letter

2 Things Recruiters HATE To Read On Cover Letters

Recruiter feeling frustrated after reading common cover letter mistakes.
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A lot of people ask, "Do recruiters even read cover letters anymore?"

The answer is yes, they 100% do. That's why it's important for job candidates to write one that stands out to recruiters in a good way—NOT a bad way.


There are things on your cover letter that could be sabotaging your chances of getting an interview.

If you do these two things when writing a cover letter, there's a good chance a recruiter won't give you a call.

You Start Your Cover Letter With "To Whom It May Concern"

Starting your cover letter off with the phrase "To whom it may concern" is very impersonal, and it shows that you didn't do your homework.

It's also an abrupt way to start your cover letter. To top it all off, it's an outdated approach. People used this phrase on cover letters decades ago.

Instead, you want to start out with a phrase like "Dear hiring team," "Dear hiring manager," or if you can find the name of the person who posted the job, address the cover letter to that person. These phrases help you put a personal touch on your cover letter, which can make you more memorable to recruiters and hiring managers.

You Put A Recap Of Your Resume In Your Cover Letter

Hiring manager reads a cover letter with common mistakes

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Often, job seekers will put all sorts of information about their job history and accomplishments in their cover letter.

The big issue with that? The hiring manager or recruiter is already going to read that information in your resume.

Quite frankly, by recapping your resume in your cover letter, you're wasting a recruiter or hiring manager's time. You're essentially making them read something twice since they've already had to look at your resume.

This is also risky because a job candidate can put something in their cover letter that makes hiring managers decide that they're not the right fit for the job even before looking at their resume.

Instead of recapping the resume, you want to get the hiring team at "hello" by writing a disruptive cover letter. This disruptive cover letter will help you stand out from other candidates and make a connection to the company you're targeting.

So, How Do You Write A Disruptive Cover Letter?

Hiring manager reads a disruptive cover letter with no mistakes

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Writing a disruptive cover letter that recruiters will love isn't as hard as you may think. In fact, it can be pretty fun if you know what to put in it!

Here's how you can write a stand out cover letter, and why it's so important to make that initial connection with recruiters or hiring managers.

Hundreds of our members at Work It Daily have used a disruptive cover letter and have gotten calls for their dream jobs!


Feel like you could use more help with your cover letter? How about help with your resume, or LinkedIn profile?

Check out our FREE resources page and Live Events Calendar.

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This post was originally published at an earlier date.

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