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One of the guarantees I’d be willing to make with any job seeker is that you’ll be asked unusual, strange, weird, and possibly illegal questions during an interview. I’ve surveyed several audiences of job seekers over the years and, in the majority of cases, more than half the audience was asked what appeared to be an illegal, personal question. However, equally concerning – and unfair to job seekers – are the strange questions that are asked. The reasons for this appear to be several:

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A recent article on LinkedIn presented the “Favorite Job Interview Questions” from 13 CEO’s. The article was interesting in several respects because it provides great insights into questions being asked. In addition, it offers a “scorecard” on the quality of interviewing today. RELATED: Need some job interview advice? Watch these tutorials! While some CEO’s scored very well with their questions, other didn’t and the final score shows quality interviewing on the losing side. I’ll use a simple scoring scale, -2, -1, 0, +1, +2. Let’s begin with the first six questions.

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In the first two parts of this series (Part 1 and Part 2), I analyzed the questions from a LinkedIn article on the “Favorite Job Interview Questions” from 13 CEO’s. I used a simple scoring scale, -2, -1, 0, +1, +2 and the “total score” was -3. There’s a very simple premise. You’ll be asked bad questions. But you don’t have to give bad answers. In Part 3, I provided some thoughts for the first six questions. Here are some specific suggestions on how the last seven of the 13 questions, both the good and the bad, can be answered. While one answer format won’t apply to all these questions, there is a strong example that will apply to many. It’s been labeled differently by several experts, the two-minute S-A-F-W response, Say a Few Words. A version I like is C-A-R Mini Stories, Challenge, Action, Result. I recommend having multiple C-A-R Mini stories prepared for each position in your work history and for your education. The focus of this preparation is on your “significant accomplishments.” Let’s take another look at the last seven questions – with possible answers.

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In Part 1 of this series, I analyzed the first six questions from a LinkedIn article on the “Favorite Job Interview Questions” from 13 CEO’s. I used a simple scoring scale, -2, -1, 0, +1, +2 and the “total score” for the first six questions was -7. Let’s see how the score changes with the next six questions.

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