Online Job Search Isn't Working, Should I Go Offline?

Dear Experts, I have recently hit a roadblock in my job search. I've been using the internet to job search and network, but most of my efforts have lead to dead ends thus far. Should I take my job search offline by going to the companies I want to work for and drop off my resume? If it is recommended, how do I network while there? Here is how our T.A.P. experts answered this question:Q#234 You need to explore all options when searching. send out R&C, drop off, join industry assn. leverage ur contacts. (@DebraWheatman) Q#234 on-line best when complementd w/off-line netwking, face2face mtgs, referals. Pple hire pple, not bytes (@juliaerickson) Q#234 Take it off-line. Pick up phone & ask for networking meetings! Info Interviews get jobs in this economy! (@jtodonnell) Q#234 Try setting up an informational interview. Be sure to ask questions and show interest. Don't leave w/o a business card. (@gradversity) Q#234 Have you tried offline networking events Check with your professional assn, alumni assn, etc. (@heatherhuhman) Our Twitter Advice Project (T.A.P.) is no longer an active campaign. To find an answer to the above question, please use the "Search" box in the right-hand column of this website.

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