If the stress of juggling school, work, and family is making life difficult, you are not alone. In 2011, 71% of the nation's 19.7 million college undergraduates also worked while getting a degree. Two in five worked at least 20 hours a week. One in five worked at for least 35 hours. A quarter have dependent children. Related: 7 Tips For Juggling Work And Grad School Not surprisingly, time-shortage is one of the biggest reasons for students dropping out before completing their degree. So how do you make sure that you stay the course? Here are top five tips for managing your time for academic – and professional – success.

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By 2018, 60% of U.S. jobs will require post-secondary education [1]. The good news is that it is easier than ever to further your education without adding unmanageable stress to you or your family. Dr. Mary Hawkins, president of Bellevue University, gives her tips on how adults can overcome the education gap to achieve their life goals.
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This is a sponsored post. When the pressure is on to get to work as soon as you have your degree, it can be difficult to stay focused on long-term goals. With today's bills to pay, tomorrow's plans can take a back-seat. The tough job market doesn't help – even though having a degree improves your chances of entering your chosen field.
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