4 Questions About Twitter Job Seeking

A few weeks ago I interviewed a designer named Hal Thomas who got a job using Twitter. To see the replay, you can visit it here. I had MANY questions about the use of Twitter in the job search we simply didn’t have time to answer. So I’m going to answer them here. Question: If you’re just getting started on Twitter, what’s the best way to find people that will target the people you're looking for to build your relationships? There are essentially two ways to find people; either through their profile or through their tweets. You can search for different key-terms that may appear on someone’s profile by using a tool called Twellow. For example, you may be looking for a marketing director for Hasboro. So you can search for “Hasboro” and find anyone who uses it in their profile. Then you can filter by job title, director, executive, etc. This is a great strategy for adding key contacts to your Twitter list. Sometimes, people tweet about topics that might not appear on their profile. For example, someone might work at Hasboro, but not declare this fact in their bio. However, it is likely they’ll tweet about their job every once in a while. In this case, you would use a tool called Twitter Search. I’ve given a brief video tutorial on how to use this tool on YouTube. You can watch it here. Question: Are you turned off by people who tweet every 10 minutes about mundane stuff, like what they had for breakfast? Twitter can get mundane, but if that breakfast you had was AMAZING, why not share the experience. The whole point of Twitter is to get personal and form relationships. Be learning about what you experience in your life, your values are revealed and people feel like they get to know you. One of the comments Sloan Kelly made, she was the one who hired Hal via Twitter, was she felt she already knew him before he even walked in the door. Enjoying this article? You could get the best career advice daily by subscribing to us via e-mail. Question: So, what are your suggestions for what you should post on Twitter? When you are first getting started, it’s easiest to retweet what other people have to say. Once you get a sense of what others are saying, it will become easy to find material of your own. I suggest you start off with these:
  1. A quote you heard or read from someone famous recently.
  2. An open ended question about a topic you’ve been thinking about.
  3. An experience you had that was noteworthy or somehow related to your future job.
  4. Something that made you happy.
  5. Something that made you sad.
Question: If you want a perspective employer to see you on Twitter, do you tag their site in your tweets? Many companies monitor their brand using Twitter. They want to know what people are saying about their products or services. Even authors are monitoring Twitter for reviews which they can quote from. Often times, when you mention a company by name, you’ll get a response. I recently purchased by multi-vitamin on an online herb store. I tweeted about my shopping experience and what a great price I got. That store wrote me back personally to thank me for my business. Job seekers can take advantage of this “back-door” approach. Just remember you don’t really know who is on the other side of that tweet. [This article was originally posted on an earlier date] Joshua Waldman is the founder of Career Enlightenment and specializes in helping job seekers leverage social media to find work quickly. Read more » articles by this approved expert | Click here » if you’re a career expert Photo credit: Shutterstock

In our new YouTube series, "Well This Happened" it's your turn to be the career coach! What would you do if you asked a coworker when the baby was due and she responded with, "I'm not pregnant." Watch the video and cast your vote b posting a comment on Youtube. We'll select one person from the correct answers at random to win free membership to the Work It Daily program. Good luck!

SHOW MORE Show less

If you've ever wondered what a Work It Daily (WID) membership could do for you, a letter we got this week provides a powerful example...

SHOW MORE Show less

There are 3 things hiring managers are trying to initially assess about you in the job interview. This video walks you through what they are looking for and offers insights into the right information to give them. Be sure to check out our free resources mentioned in the video too. They are:

SHOW MORE Show less

Last week during my Office Hours on Youtube, a client asked about how to deal with a workplace bully. After spending many years in corporate HR, I flipped to the other side and became a career therapist. So, I've seen both sides of this situation in the workplace. In this video, I discuss why people struggle to deal with bullies and what you can do to change the situation instantly.

This week, I did something that truly scared me. I sent an email to over 120,000 Work It Daily newsletter subscribers and asked them to answer the question, "What do we do?"

SHOW MORE Show less

A market correction is going to happen. When it does, layoffs will follow. I've been in the HR and recruiting industry for over two decades and have seen three recessions of varying sizes. In the video above, I explain how to tell when a recession is coming and what that means to you and your career. While many people will skip watching this. Or, will watch it and do nothing. I hope YOU are the smart, savvy professional who sees how important it is to prepare for unexpected, unwelcomed career circumstances.

SHOW MORE Show less

In this video, you'll learn how to tell if your career is plateauing due to the Executive Blues. You'll also learn what you can do to fix the problem and get your "executive energy" back so you can keep your career on track and set goals to reach new heights of success!

Want to watch the full video tutorial by J.T.?

CLICK HERE to get access!