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Have you ever felt like you totally rocked an interview? You had all your questions and answers prepared, the hiring manager really seemed impressed, and they even hinted at a call back. You wake up the next morning with a huge grin on your face expecting an email or a phone call, but you receive nothing. No worries, right? “They will probably get back to me tomorrow," you think to yourself.

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However, tomorrow comes and goes, as does the next day and the day after that, all without a phone call or an email. Days turn into a week, and you begin to get a bit antsy. Hope starts to dwindle as the questions begin to mount.

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Stressed out by the job search? Anxious about what’s on the other side? You’re not alone. Fear, frustration, and general tension (both physical and emotional) are common side effects of the effort to identify your next role. But there are ways to counteract them. Related: 10 Creative Ways To Beat Career Stress Fortunately, there are time-testing techniques for managing this stress, which I call the six P’s (not to be confused with the four P’s in the marketing world). They are planning, persistence, perspective, positivity, physical attentiveness and “phriends and phamily."

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Too many of us believe that there is some badge of honor to be had if we never leave our desks during the workday. Indeed, we work circles around our colleagues while we wait for our bosses to notice and give us a huge salary increase or a plum promotion. At the very least, we should get the "Employee of the Year Award," right? The trouble is that that hardly ever happens. Hardly ever? Who am I kidding… it never happens except in the movies… or in our poor deluded fantasies. Related: 5 Quick Tips For Working In Walking At Work The fact is that no one cares if you are putting your health at risk in your effort to impress the boss with your Energizer Bunny dedication, unless, of course, you get sick because you have been working too much and not taking care of yourself. If you are out sick for any period because you have compromised your health, you will get noticed all right, but for all the wrong reasons. Increasingly, we are learning of the dangers inherent in sitting at our desks for too long and of not working on the creation of a greater sense of balance in our daily lives. Study after study offers evidence of the health consequences of living a sedentary lifestyle, which includes working too long and sitting at our desks without frequent breaks. The remedy, or at least one of several possible remedies, is to take a more realistic approach to your workday. That includes taking frequent breaks during the day and going out to lunch whenever you can. If you can't go out for lunch, at least get away from your desk at lunchtime. The research is clear. Sitting for too long at your desk is bad for your health. A sedentary lifestyle that includes being at your computer for too long at a stretch can lead to increased risks for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Sitting for extended periods can also lead to poor posture and weak back muscles. Sitting in one spot for extended periods also strains your eyes and the muscles in your neck and shoulders. And finally, staying with a problem for too long without taking a break can delay your ability to see the problem differently and come up with a solution more quickly. The bottom line is you need to take frequent breaks throughout your workday. You need to take both a mid-morning and a mid-afternoon break of at least 15 minutes each. You also need to go out to lunch to get away from your desk completely for at least 30 minutes. If you can't "go out" then at least eat your lunch in the break room or the company cafeteria, but avoid eating a snack at your desk answering emails, fielding phone calls and calling that "lunch." Your body and your brain need frequent breaks throughout the day. Your body needs to stretch; your eyes need a break from the glare of your computer, and your brain needs an opportunity to refresh every so often. Failing to take frequent breaks during the day will only make your physically ill in the long run, and no one will be giving you any awards for that. Additionally, not only will you be creating hardship for your colleagues, but the workload will also mount in your absence. You need to take a break every little while throughout the day. You need to pace yourself. You need to take care of YOU. You will feel better; you will be healthier; you will be more creative. At the end of the day, you will also be a happier employee. This post was originally published on an earlier date.

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Many, if not most, Americans are stressed out, overwhelmed, and overburdened these days. In fact, too many of them are feeling totally stressed out and exhausted. Going through the day feeling stressed has, in fact, become the "new normal." People have forgotten how to relax, even when they are supposed to be on vacation. Related: 6 Tips For Managing Job Search Stress We are learning more and more every day about the health consequences of stress on human beings, both physically and psychologically, and research is constantly revealing new information about the effects of stress on the overall quality of our lives. New books are coming out almost daily pointing to the problems inherent in not getting our stress levels under control. Most of us think of stress as bad—something we would like just to eliminate once and for all. A lot of the stressors that we experience are not the result of negative events, however. Getting married, having a baby, buying or selling a house… these are all stress creators, but they are the result of positive events. Stress isn't necessarily good or bad. It's created by change. Furthermore, the stress we feel is more often the result of our perception of the change as opposed to the fact of the change. One person might not be stressed by the same event that would send another person completely over the edge. So, stress doesn't have to be "bad." In fact, new research points to the fact that stress by itself isn't as troublesome as our attitude about stress. We do need to pay attention to how we respond to stress, however. A report from the American Institute of Stress indicates that (1) 40% of American adults experience negative health effects that are the result of stress, and (2) between 70%-95% of the visits made to our family doctors are the result of stress-related complaints. As bad has this information may sound, there are practices that you can adopt as part of your daily lifestyle that will help you deal with stress more proactively and responsibly. There are, in fact, seven (7) practical habits that you could start incorporating into your daily lifestyle that would help you become stronger and more resilient. They don't cost anything, and they are simple, if not necessarily easy, practices that you could begin right away if you were to decide to practice them as part of your own routine.

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