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In this week's edition of Well This Happened we tackled Janet's situation involving an employee who lied about taking a sick day.

Janet said she tries to foster an environment of trust at work and was taken aback that her employee decided to lie about taking a sick day, rather than come to her and be honest about needing the day off.

Addressing a situation like this with an employee can be very uncomfortable and requires some finesse.

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There’s nothing more challenging than to have a co-worker say something to you that’s rude, makes you doubt yourself, or just hurts your feelings. But how do you deal with a condescending co-worker? When that happens, the first thing you need to do is understand why that comment bothered you so much. What about what this person said irritated you? You might even consider taking time to write it out. Try to recall exactly what this person said. You’ll probably find that it was a specific word or tone this person used, or the way it was delivered that set you off. It’s important that you identify this because you need to be able to articulate it when you go talk to the person. That’s right, the next thing you need to do is confront the person in question. This is not the time to bury it, ignore it, or let it slide. The moment you allow condescending behavior to happen, you are defining how you are to be treated. People treat us the way that we ALLOW them to treat us. If you don’t want to deal with a condescending co-worker, you have to nip this behavior in the bud. So, understand exactly what about the comment bothered you. If you need to, talk it out with someone else before you bring it up to your co-worker. Then, confront your co-worker privately so he or she is aware of how you feel. When you have this conversation, your co-worker might act defensive. However, he or she will likely be more shocked and surprised. He or she might not have intended the comment to come out that way. If someone is being condescending, whether they realize it or not, it’s important to call them out on it. However, you need to do it in a calm and structured way. Don’t just brush it off!

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Think your boss is having an affair? You’re not alone. Today, career experts J.T. O’Donnell and Dale Dauten tackle the following question from a reader...

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Do you ever feel like your colleagues are “getting away” with stuff at work? Have you ever wanted to rat out a co-worker for not being completely honest? In today’s “Ask J.T. And Dale,” career experts J.T. O’Donnell and Dale Dauten tackle the following question...

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